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Member of the Family: Manson, Murder and Me by Dianne Lake and Deborah Herman

51wTNZH99oLWhen fourteen-year-old Dianne Lake encountered the enigmatic Charles Manson and his ‘Family’, little did she know the huge effect it was going to have on her life. Now, fifty years later, Dianne is telling her story – a first-hand story of her experiences with one of the most heinous characters in American history, and what a story it is…

Over the years, I have read several books about Charles Manson, including one written as a result of interviews with the man himself. Where this book differs, though, is that it is affording us a first-hand account of someone who lived through the free-love era of late-1960s America as part of Manson’s ‘Family’.

The first third of the book details Dianne’s early life, which was far from conventional. Born into a seemingly typical family, secrets begin to rear their heads and soon, her parents make the decision to ‘drop out’ of normal society. This action set the tone for the rest of Dianne’s life, as they moved from place to place, taking drugs and living in several communal habitations. When she made the decision to go it alone, I found it hard to remember that she was only fourteen at the time. It was clear to see that she craved some normality and would have loved to have had the opportunity to attend school and make something of herself. The actions of her parents, though, were the first steps into pushing her towards Manson.

When we finally meet Charlie Manson, there is no immediate indication of what is to come. Initially, Dianne gets what she yearns for – a family who look out for each other. As time progresses, though, Manson’s true nature begins to emerge and it is interesting to read that, with hindsight, Dianne wished that she had noticed these signs and got away whilst she had the chance. Such was Manson’s pull, though, and the fact that she felt she was in love with him, she remained in his clutches until he was arrested. It was difficult to read about the abuse she endured during her time with the ‘Family’ and how her skewed idea of what was normal didn’t give her the impetus to run away.

If you read this hoping to find out more about the Tate/LaBianca killings, then you are going to be disappointed as this is not the purpose of the book. Dianne was not part of the atrocities but became aware of them after the fact. Repulsed by what she found out and realising the true nature of the man she adored, it became a relief when they were finally picked up by the authorities and she could start to remove traces of the cult from her life. It was pleasing to read how Dianne managed to turn her life around, thanks to the kindness of a police officer and also how she found happiness with a husband and the real family she had always longed for.

Member of the Family is a fascinating, well-written read and I sincerely hope that Dianne continues to live a happy life, free from memories of the past.

With thanks to Rosie Margesson and Harper Collins UK for my copy of the book.



No Safe Place by Patricia Gibney

When the body of a young woman is found at the bottom of an open grave, Detective Lottie Parker fears that it could be Elizabeth Byrne who, only days earlier, vanished after getting on a train. The case stirs up memories of a past case for Corrigan, her superior officer, when another young woman from Ragmullin disappeared a decade ago in a similar way. A coincidence or could there be a connection? When two more women vanish in a similar fashion, Lottie fears that there is a serial killer at large. With major problems of her own and a new boss to contend with, this looks like being one of Lottie Parker’s most difficult cases to date.

No Safe Place follows on from the previous book The Lost Child but as this could still be read as a standalone, I will refrain from giving any spoilers! Lottie is still struggling with events from her past so when she discovers that her boss is going to have an operation and his post is being covered by someone she dislikes immensely, it is inevitable that she will, once again, turn to medication to get her through the day. Lottie is an incredibly tragic character yet at the same time is tenacious and totally committed to her job. I think most fans of this series are desperate for her to have a bit of luck in her life and it’s about time her and Boyd sorted themselves out once and for all!

The mystery is a fascinating one. Young women are going missing on a train and there are very few, if any, witnesses. Several suspects are put forward and it is not until the very end of the book that we finally discover the culprit and the reason behind them doing what they are doing. Patricia Gibney has done a fantastic job in concealing who the guilty party is to the point where the clues given could apply to more than one character. I liked how all the sub-plots linked together and whereas in some books these links could be tenuous, this was not the case here. All loose ends were tied up nicely and the conclusion was realistic and satisfying.

As in previous books, the author has thrown in a few curveballs which will, hopefully, be explored in subsequent books. One in particular (which linked to the previous book) was a shocker and I can’t wait to see what happens there!

This is a series that is going from strength to strength – Lottie is becoming one of those familiar fictional characters that seems as though they have been around forever. I hope there is much more to come!

With thanks to Bookouture and Net Galley for the ARC.

**BLOG TOUR** Tell No Lies by Lisa Hartley

It is my pleasure to be the latest stop on the blog tour for Tell No Lies, the latest book from Lisa Hartley and also to be able to share a fascinating guest post written by the author herself about the setting in crime novels.

Over to Lisa…

In crime fiction, the setting of a novel can be hugely visible, almost a character in its own right, or it can fade into the background. Many British cities have fictional detectives associated with them: Ian Rankin’s John Rebus in Edinburgh, Stuart MacBride’s Logan McRae in Aberdeen, Val McDermid’s Carol Jordan (and Dr Tony Hill) in Manchester. London is the home of several crime series, including Mark Billingham’s Tom Thorne books, and it’s also the city I decided to set my Detective Caelan Small novels in.

I already knew I wanted to write about an undercover police officer. My previous books have been set in Lincolnshire, both in the city of Lincoln itself and also in a fictional nearby town. It’s an area I’m familiar with and feel comfortable and confident writing about. The problem is, a small town setting can be limiting. Is it feasible for a city the size of Lincoln to have undercover officers? I didn’t think so. I needed somewhere bigger, somewhere Caelan and her skills would really be needed. My reasoning was that London would be the perfect place for an undercover officer to be based because of its size and diversity. Also, I knew the Metropolitan Police have such units within their ranks.

London is made up of so many different areas, from the most affluent to the most deprived. It’s a city of contrasts, a place where you can make or lose a fortune. There are opportunities to make money, either legally or in the shadows. I wanted Caelan to be a part of both worlds. As she moves through the city, there are recognisable locations, and I hope they help ground the stories, making it easier to picture Caelan policing the streets. I don’t know London well, but I’m lucky in that my partner grew up around the city, and so I have someone I can go to and ask questions. Google maps and street view are also a huge help, and I have visited London a few times, so I’ve seen the “tourist” spots – heard Big Ben chiming the hours, rushed through some of the Underground stations Caelan uses. I wanted to try to capture the feel of moving around London without sounding too much like a guide book. Caelan lives in the city and it’s very familiar to her, so she wouldn’t be constantly noticing landmarks or marvelling at buildings she’d only previously seen in photographs as a visitor would. I have used some real locations, but some are fictional and appear only in the books.

Caelan’s world can be a dangerous place, and I didn’t think it would be fair to use a real location or premises in those situations. I want Caelan’s London to be believable, but not necessarily an exact copy of the real city. There’s a place in TELL NO LIES (it also appears in the previous book, ASK NO QUESTIONS) that I like to imagine exists, or at least that similar places do – a secret, subterranean office. Caelan has been summoned there on a couple of occasions, and I must admit, it’s a place I love writing about, because it encapsulates everything about Caelan’s job that appeals to me, and hopefully to the reader. Its location is secret, it’s well guarded, and it’s right under the nose of people passing by on a busy London street. The idea of the place was partly inspired by a visit I made to the Churchill War Rooms a few years ago. Formerly the underground bunker where Winston Churchill and his staff met and worked during the Second World War, it’s now a museum, and a fascinating, highly atmospheric place that made a huge impression on me. When I was imaging what such an office might be like, I thought back to walking through the warren of underground corridors and rooms and tried to capture some sense of it. To me, the sense of place in a novel doesn’t have to mean your characters walk around an exact replica of a real city. A blend of fact and fiction can be just as effective.

Tell No Lies was published by Canelo on 19th February.

A tortured body is found in a basement. Drug dealing and people smuggling is on the rise. Then police start going missing.

There seems to be no connection between the crimes, but Detective Caelan Small senses something isn’t right.

Plunged into a new investigation, lives are on the line. And in the web of gangs, brothels and nerve-shattering undercover work, Caelan must get to the truth – or be killed trying.

And then there’s Nicky…

With thanks to Lisa Hartley for the brilliant guest post and to Ellie Pilcher at Canelo for organising the blog tour.




An Unquiet Ghost by Linda Stratmann

Cousins George Fernwood and Mary Clifton are engaged to be married but feel that they cannot go through with the wedding until an event from their past has finally been resolved. Twenty years previously, their grandfather died in his bed and it is thought that someone in the family poisoned him. Desperate to find out what really happened, the couple are keen to talk to a medium in order to communicate with their dead grandfather. Knowing that Mina Scarletti has a reputation for unmasking fraudulent psychics, they engage her in assisting in their quest for the truth.

Although I had read some of Linda Stratmann’s Frances Doughty series, I had not yet come across the books featuring Mina Scarletti. This is the third book in the series but I found it could be read as a standalone. Mina is a fascinating character, her scoliosis preventing her from participating in Brighton’s society. Despite her disability, however, she is the epitome of a modern Victorian woman, accepting that she will never marry and writing books published by her family’s publishing house. I admired her tenacity and her ability to use her brainpower to aid her investigations.

The search for a legitimate medium is a fascinating one and I enjoyed reading about the different methods undertaken by these charlatans in order to defraud the bereaved. Like Mina, I found myself searching for ways the ‘readings’ could have been fabricated and was intrigued by how these people were happy to play the ‘long game’ in order to achieve their aim.

Although beyond what Mina has been tasked, she nevertheless becomes interested in solving the murder of Thomas Fernwood. As she is unable to travel a lot due to her scoliosis, some of the research is done via letter. I enjoyed reading the letters that appeared throughout the book and, as well as giving an insight into Mina’s thoughts, it also provides the reader with an understanding of what went on behind Victorian closed doors. I was surprised when the poisoner was revealed although could understand why when the circumstances were explained.

An Unquiet Ghost is perfect for any fans of Victoriana who enjoy a gentle mystery.

With thanks to Caoimhe O’Brien and Sapere Books for my copy of the book.


**BLOG TOUR** Last of the Summer Moët by Wendy Holden

Holden_02_LAST OF THE SUMMER MOET_previewToday I  am pleased to be the latest stop on the blog tour for Last of the Summer Moët by Wendy Holden and am delighted to share an extract with you!

Top reporter Laura Lake has struck journalistic gold.

She’s discovered a super-exclusive English village where the rich and famous own weekend retreats. Where film stars, Turner-prize winners and Cabinet ministers park their helicopters outside the gastropub and buy £100 sourdough loaves from the deli.

Outsiders are strictly forbidden. But luckily Laura’s best friend Lulu, a logo-obsessed socialite with a heart as huge as her sunglasses, suddenly fancies a quiet life in the country. The door to this enchanted rural idyll opens for Laura. Revealing a great professional opportunity.

Can Laura write an exposé before the snobbish villagers suss her true identity? And before the world’s poshest pub quiz triggers a political scandal not seen since Profumo?

The Extract

Laura’s phone now rang, and while she meant to ignore it in the face of this latest twist in the drama, her screen told her that this was, at last, the elusive Brad Plant. The representative on Earth of Savannah Bouche was finally gett ing in touch.

‘Buckingham Palace,’he snarled in his nasal American tones.

‘What?’ Laura was confused.

‘Buckingham Palace? You know it? Big building at the top of the Mall?’ He pronounced it ‘maul’.

‘Of course I do. What about it?’

‘Miss Bouche wants to go on a tour of it. With you. While you interview her.’

Wendy Holden pic_preview
Wendy Holden

Laura only half heard. Her attention was on Carinthia’s office door. Christopher Stone had closed it behind him, and nothing could be heard from within. What was going on?

‘You still there?’snarled Plant from the other end.

Laura forced herself to concentrate. ‘Buckingham Palace? She wants to meet there?’

Was there a worse option in the whole of London? Buckingham Palace had famously huge queues. There would be crowds of mobbing tourists. There had to be a better alternative. ‘What about a pod in the London Eye?’

‘Miss Bouche wants the Palace,’ Brad cut in. ‘We’ve arranged a private tour.’

Oh, what did any of it matter, Laura thought. Carinthia was almost certainly being sacked, at this very moment. Which meant that, as her deputy, she would be next.

Not for the first time since coming to Society she was facing the prospect of being fired for no fault of her own. What was unusual was that this time Clemency Makepeace had nothing to do with it.

‘Okay,’ she said to Brad Plant.

And so it was arranged. Laura – presuming she was still in gainful employment – was to present herself at the main palace entrance at ten o’clock on Monday morning.

She put the phone down at the precise moment Christopher Stone emerged from Carinthia’s office. His lightly tanned face wore its usual calm expression, but there was a clench to his jaw and a light to his eyes that made Laura fear the worst.

Her heart sank as, in his gleaming handmade shoes, he rapidly traversed the black carpet tiles between them and stopped before her desk. Laura shot to her feet at the precise moment that Christopher Stone placed a pair of lightly tanned knuckles down on the table and leant over towards her. The collision was sharp and violent.

‘Ow!’ howled the CEO of the British Magazine Company, reeling away and clutching his smoothly shaved face.

Laura was rooted to the spot, buzzing with the horror of having headbutted the man described in a recent piece by the Financial Times as the most powerful man in magazine publishing. That really was it, then. Whatever slim chance there had been had evaporated. She was surely finished now.

Stone turned back towards Laura. He was still holding his chin, and his watering eyes glittered coldly. She cringed inwardly, expecting marching orders of the most vehement persuasion.

‘Carinthia is leaving,’ Stone told her.

Laura bowed her head. So it really was all over.

‘Arrangements are being made for her to enter a rehabilitation facility,’ Stone went on, in the light, clipped voice that belied the heft of the power he wielded. He paused and looked Laura keenly up and down. She waited to be informed that her services were no longer required either.

‘You will edit Society until she returns.’

Last of the Summer Moët blog tour banner_preview

Monthly Roundup: February 2018

I can’t believe that we are in March already. Where does the time go? February has brought books by some authors new to me and also some of my ‘old’ favourites!

Books I have Read

My Mother the Liar by Ann Troup

The Porter family have more secrets than most and when the bodies of a man and a baby are discovered at the family home, a can of worms is opened that will change the lives of them all for ever.


Orchard View by Deborah J Miles

A fascinating tale of a house through history and its various residents. After bodies are discovered in the garden, the present owner’s actions set in motion an intriguing chain of events.


The Wicked Trade by Nathan Dylan Goodwin

The seventh book in the Morton Farrier series sees the forensic genealogist researching the shadowy world of Georgian smuggling as he tries to uncover the story of his client’s ancestor, Ann Fothergill. A series that just keeps getting better!


Taken by Monty Marsden

Has the infamous serial killer Riondino struck again? Dr. Claps is determined that, this time, he will not get away and so he heads to Ecuador on his trail. A gruesome tale of murder that had me on the edge of my seat. Full review to follow as part of the blog tour.


Splinter in the Blood by Ashley Dyer

Another serial killer book, this time set in Liverpool. For months, The Thorn Killer has been terrorizing their victims, tattooing them using thorns before finally killing them. With a suspicious-looking police team behind the investigation, this made for a brilliant read and one I hope will form part of a series.


An Unquiet Ghost by Linda Stratmann

The third book in the Mina Scarletti series, set in Brighton in 1871,  sees her engaged by a betrothed couple to find a genuine psychic who can help them discover which of their family murdered their grandfather several years before.  A great read for anyone interested in Victorian crime fiction.

Books I have Acquired

Beneath the imposing Kollen Mountain lies a small village where the children run in and out of one another’s houses and play unafraid in the streets. But when a naked body is found by the lake at the top of the mountain, its seeming tranquillity is disturbed forever.

Inspector Sejer, a tough, no-nonsense policeman whose own life is tinged by sadness, is called in to investigate. As the suspense builds, and the list of suspects grows, Sejer’s determination to discover the truth leads him to peel away layer upon layer of distrust and lies in this tiny community where apparently normal family ties hide dark secrets.


Following the recent death of Charles Manson – the leader of the sinister 60s cult – Dianne Lake reveals the true story of life with Manson and his ‘family’, who became notorious for a series of shocking murders during the summer of 1969.

In this poignant and disturbing memoir of lost innocence, coercion, survival, and healing, Dianne Lake chronicles her years with Charles Manson, revealing for the first time how she became the youngest member of his Family and offering new insights into one of the twentieth century’s most notorious criminals and life as one of his “girls.”

At age fourteen, Dianne Lake―with little more than a note in her pocket from her hippie parents granting her permission to leave them―became one of “Charlie’s girls,” a devoted acolyte of cult leader Charles Manson. Over the course of two years, the impressionable teenager endured manipulation, psychological control, and physical abuse as the harsh realities and looming darkness of Charles Manson’s true nature revealed itself. From Spahn ranch and the group acid trips, to the Beatles’ White Album and Manson’s dangerous messiah-complex, Dianne tells the riveting story of the group’s descent into madness as she lived it.

Though she never participated in any of the group’s gruesome crimes and was purposely insulated from them, Dianne was arrested with the rest of the Manson Family, and eventually learned enough to join the prosecution’s case against them. With the help of good Samaritans, including the cop who first arrested her and later adopted her, the courageous young woman eventually found redemption and grew up to lead an ordinary life.

While much has been written about Charles Manson, this riveting account from an actual Family member is a chilling portrait that recreates in vivid detail one of the most horrifying and fascinating chapters in modern American history.


Jack the Ripper is stalking the streets of London. Can anyone stop the serial killer before more women are murdered? 

London, 1888

Whitechapel is full of the noise of August Bank Holiday celebrations. Everyone is in high spirits until a woman – Martha Turner – is discovered brutally murdered.

Her friend, Esther, a lowly seamstress turned female sleuth, is determined to find the killer.

A young police officer, Jack Enright, takes the lead on the case, and he and Esther soon embark on a professional – and personal – relationship.

When another murder is committed and whispers of a slasher calling himself Jack the Ripper start flowing through the London streets, the search becomes even more desperate.

The police are on the wrong track and the young couple take matters into their own hands, and soon find themselves navigating through London’s dark underbelly.

Can they find the murderer before he kills again? Will anyone listen to their suspicions?
Or will this dark presence continue to haunt Whitechapel…?


I’ve tried to be a bit more selective with my Net Galley books although there is one I’m desperate to get, currently awaiting confirmation…

Happy reading!




Splinter in the Blood by Ashley Dyer

41DaNTibw8L._SX326_BO1,204,203,200_For months, a serial killer dubbed ‘The Thorn Killer’ has terrorized Liverpool, daubing victims with macabre tattoos over most of their body. With no tangible leads, Detective Greg Carver is living and breathing the case… until he is shot in his own home. Finding him in his armchair, the actions of his colleague Ruth Lake are more than suspicious. Instead of calling it in, she removes the gun, carefully wipes down surfaces and takes away Carver’s case notes. The only problem is, Carver isn’t actually dead. Waking in his hospital room, with few memories of what happened that night, his obsession with the case grows. What exactly is Ruth hiding and will it cause more blood to be shed?

Well, this book certainly grabs your attention from the off! It’s not often you read a book where, right from the start, you are incredibly suspicious of the detective in charge but from the moment Ruth Lake tampers with the crime scene, I was not sure whether she was a reliable officer. This mistrust remained for much of the book and, coupled with the unknown reason behind Carver’s shooting, this made for an interesting read where you don’t know if the police can be trusted.

The modus operandi of the killer was a particularly gruesome and painful one and when we actually experience them in action, I found myself wincing as they used thorns to tattoo their latest victim. Several possible candidates are put forward as to who the killer is and I was pleased to spot a clue whilst reading that steered me towards that person. One part in particular resonated with me as, being from the city where it is set, the locations were very familiar. Let’s just say the Fairy Glen in Sefton Park now takes on a whole new meaning!

I liked the complicated relationship that Lake and Carver shared and feel that there is definitely more to be explored if this book becomes a series. There is a definite respect between the two detectives although, in light of the cases they are working on, there was also a lot of apprehension. Both detectives are very tenacious and probably a lot more like each other than they care to realise.

As the book progressed, I found it hard to put down and I whizzed through the second half at a rate of knots. There were numerous twists and turns that held my attention right until the very end. I hope that a second book will follow.

With thanks to Net Galley and Little, Brown Book Group UK for my ARC.



The Wicked Trade by Nathan Dylan Goodwin

Genealogist Morton Farrier finds himself researching the shadowy world of Georgian smugglers after a client asks him to research the life of his ancestor, Ann Fothergill. Using a letter she wrote in 1827 as his starting point, research soon points to her connection with the notorious Aldington Gang, a group from the south of England whose reputation spread far and wide. Just exactly how did Ann make her money and why is someone in the present day so interested in Morton’s work?

This is the seventh book in the Morton Farrier series and, I don’t know how he does it, but Nathan Dylan Goodwin keeps pulling it out of the bag! I’m a huge fan of genealogical fiction and it’s fair to say that while some is better than others, I would definitely put this author up there with the best. Such is my love of Morton Farrier, as soon as I realised that another book had been published, I immediately downloaded it and, despite my mounting reading pile, started to read straight away!

Like other books in the series, The Wicked Trade is told in multiple time frames, in this case the present day and the 1820s. Both parts of the story were equally as compelling and I enjoyed finding out about Ann’s life and also the research Morton took to uncover it. As a fellow genealogist, I am always interested in Morton’s visits to record offices and I am always pleased with the author’s attention to detail. Morton’s life has changed a lot since the start of the series, and since the birth of his daughter he has other commitments in addition to his job so it was good to see how he is juggling his personal and professional life.

The story of Ann Fothergill was a fascinating one and showed how it doesn’t matter the circumstances in which you were born, if there is a chance to improve your life you should take it. I found I had mixed feelings towards Ann. I admired her for her ability to turn her life around from an illiterate streetwalker to the owner of public houses but, on the other hand, her involvement with the Aldington Gang and the subsequent events left me with a nasty taste in my mouth.

I loved the historical detail in the book and it painted a great picture of how smugglers operated in the nineteenth century. The use of language that would have been spoken at the time also gave the story a more authentic feel.

There is still much to tell about Morton Farrier so I hope that another book is in the pipeline!

**BLOG TOUR** The Bad Daughter by Joy Fielding

Today, I am pleased to be able to share with you an extract from Joy Fielding’s latest book, The Bad Daughter, which will be published on 27th February.

The Blurb



Robin Davis hasn’t spoken to her family in six years.

Not since it happened.

Then they’re attacked; left fighting for their lives.

And Robin is back.

All families have their secrets.

And one of theirs may have put them all in terrible danger . . .



The Extract

Robin climbed out of the too hard queen-size bed and shuffled toward the bathroom. Why do all motel rooms look alike? she wondered. Is there some union rule that dictates they all be uninteresting rectangles in shades of beige and brown? Not that she was an expert in motel decor, having stayed in only a few over the years. She’d gone from her parents’ crowded house in Red Bluff to a dorm room at Berkeley, back to her parents’ house to work and earn money to continue her education, on to a small shared apartment off campus, then back and forth between Berkeley and Red Bluff to help care for her mother, then on to a cramped studio apartment in Los Angeles, and finally to the spacious two-bedroom unit she shared with Blake.

Blake, she thought, silently turning the name over on her tongue as she stepped into the tub. What must he be thinking? She turned on the faucet for the shower, then had to brace herself against the wall as a torrent of ice-cold water shot from the showerhead.

Blake would be furious with her.

She hadn’t called him since yesterday afternoon. Even then, she hadn’t spoken to him directly, but just left a message with his pretty new assistant to the effect that she had to go to Red Bluff to deal with a family emergency and she’d call him later. Then she’d canceled the week’s remaining appointments, gone home to pack a small suitcase, and taken a cab to the airport, where she’d boarded the first available flight to Sacramento, arriving at almost six o’clock in the evening. The bus to Red Bluff didn’t leave till the next morning, but the thought of renting a car and making the drive herself had proved too daunting, and in truth, she was in no hurry to get there. Instead she’d found a motel close to the bus terminal and checked in. She’d eschewed dinner, instead wolfing down a Three Musketeers bar she got from the vending machine down the hall.

She also resisted turning on the TV, hoping to avoid reports of the shooting. She could handle only so much information, process only so much. She really didn’t want to know every awful detail yet.

She thought about calling Blake again, but then remembered he’d said something about a dinner meeting with clients, so why bother? He was busy. He was always busy. Too busy to phone, obviously. Too busy to spare a few seconds to inquire as to what sort of family emergency would necessitate her taking off like that, to return to a place she’d sworn never to go back to. Would it have been so hard for him to interrupt one of his seemingly endless meetings to call her, to feign at least a modicum of interest?

So maybe he wouldn’t be furious that she hadn’t tried contacting him again. Maybe he’d be relieved. Maybe she’d finally handed him the ammunition he’d been waiting for to end their relationship once and for all.

Not that he could do anything to help the situation, she reminded herself. His specialty was corporate law, not criminal law. And it wasn’t as if he even knew her father. Or her sister. Or any member of her screwed-up family, except her brother, Alec, who lived in San Francisco, so they’d actually met only twice. She’d left a message for Alec, but he hadn’t called her back either. So screw both of them, she’d decided, turning off her cell phone and climbing into bed at barely eight o’clock.

Joy Fielding is the New York Times bestselling author of Charley’s Web, Heartstopper, Mad River Road, See Jane Run, and other acclaimed novels. She divides her time between Toronto and Palm Beach, Florida.

With thanks to Emily and Imogen at Bonnier Zaffre.

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