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Top 5 Wednesday

Top 5 Wednesday – Favourite Science Fiction and Fantasy Books

I admit to not really being a big fan of the science fiction and fantasy genres, so gave had to go back to my childhood for my top 5 this week!

C. S. Lewis: The Lion, The Witch and the Wardrobe

An absolute classic – I’m sure I’m not the only person who, as a child, wished that you could access another world via the back of a wardrobe! This is one of those stories that just never grows old.

Enid Blyton: The Magic Faraway Tree series

As a child, I loved Enid Blyton’s mystery stories but The Magic Faraway Tree series was definitely among my favourite books. Who wouldn’t want to visit places like the land of goodies and the land of birthdays and have friends like Moonface and Silky?

C. S. Lewis: The Magician’s Nephew

Although The Lion, The Witch and The Wardrobe is probably the more well-known of the Chronicles of Narnia, this one was always my favourite. Written as the sixth in the series, it has since been renumbered as the first as it is a prequel to the other books.

Roald Dahl: Charlie and the Chocolate Factory

charlie_and_the_chocolate_factoryAlthough this is set in the ‘real world’, it is very much a fantasy story with children turning into giant blueberries and shrinking and getting stuck inside a television! The moral of this story is a simple one – be a good child!

Roald Dahl: George’s Marvellous Medicine

The story of George Kranky and the medicine he made for his not-so-nice grandma has always stuck with me ever since it was read to us at school. I wonder how many children, over the years, have tried to replicate the toxic mixture at home?!

Top 5 Wednesday: Fictional Jobs You’d Want to Have

As the majority of my reading comes from the crime genre, it was inevitable that most of my inspiration for this post would come from there!

Ruth Galloway – Forensic Archaeologist

img_0987Although her main job is that of a university lecturer, Dr. Ruth Galloway has become more well-known for her work in advising the police force in cases involving the discovery of skeletal remains and other buried items. At times, this has been quite a dangerous career move but it’s definitely never boring! I think I’d give the parts where she is pursued by crazed gunmen a miss though!

 

Jefferson Tayte – Genealogist

To some people, spending time in record offices and traipsing around old churchyards might sound like their idea of a nightmare, but for me it’s like a dream come true! As someone who researches their family history, this is a career that I could definitely see myself doing one day! Again, though, preferably without the people trying to kill me to keep secrets hidden!

 

Robert Langdon – Symbologist

infernoWho wouldn’t relish the chance of travelling round Europe, visiting significant museums, galleries and places of worship? Having access to places that the ordinary person would never get to see whilst solving codes in order to protect mankind sounds like my idea of fun!

 

 

Miss Honey – Teacher9780141365466

This would be a busman’s holiday for me but which teacher would not be happy with a class of happy, well-behaved, intelligent children? Of course, having a child like Matilda in your class would be good for the end of day tidying up too!

 

Willy Wonka – Chocolate Factory Owner

charlie_and_the_chocolate_factoryIt’s back to Roald Dahl for my final choice. Inventing new chocolates and sweets and owning the most fantastic chocolate factory in the world is every child’s dream! Pair that with the highly entertaining Oompa Loompas and work would be an enjoyable experience every day!

Top 5 Wednesday: Books to Get You Out of a Reading Slump

I’ve been looking for ideas for something different to post on my blog so was pleased to discover the Goodreads ‘Top 5 Wednesday‘ group. While I can’t promise to partake every Wednesday, I’m going to give it a good try!

Today’s topic is an interesting one. While I’ve never really experienced a reading slump, there are some books that, over the years, I’ve returned to numerous times when I didn’t really know what to read next. There are also a few series where I know I could pick up any one of the books at any time to read.

1. Ruth Rendell, Shake Hands For Ever

img_1038I have been a huge fan of Ruth Rendell’s Inspector Wexford novels ever since seeing the first one on TV. This one is, by far, my favourite and one that I have read and watched numerous times. When a woman is found strangled in her own home, Chief Inspector Wexford undertakes an investigation that soon turns into an obsession, threatening his career. He knows who the killer is, but can he prove it before it is too late?

2. Sue Townsend, The Secret Diary of Adrian Mole aged 13¾

img_1040I remember reading this book at a fairly young age and, despite probably not understanding everything at the time, finding it incredibly funny. This series is one that I pick up every few years as each book is a quick read and guarantees me a good laugh. Detailing the trials and tribulations of teenager Adrian Mole, he writes candidly about his parents’ marital troubles, teenage angst and his love for Pandora Braithwaite.

3. Enid Blyton, The Mystery of the Missing Necklace

img_1039Enid Blyton’s ‘Five Find-Outers’ books were probably what encouraged my love of crime/mystery books. As a child, this one was always my favourite, and I remember taking it out of the school library to read at least once every year! I recently purchased a box set of this series and can’t wait to revisit my childhood in one of those rare reading lulls! In The Mystery of the Missing Necklace, someone is stealing jewels but when an expensive necklace goes missing and the police are stumped, it is up to the children to save the day.

4. Elly Griffiths’ ‘Ruth Galloway’ series

img_1041A recent convert to the novels of Elly Griffiths, I have, over the past year, read each one of the ‘Ruth Galloway’ series. Ruth, an archaeologist, teaches at university but is also developing a reputation for being the go-to person when the local police unearth human remains. These are books that I know, in time, I will read over and over again.

5. Steve Robinson’s ‘Jefferson Tayte’ series

img_1042Genealogical mysteries are a fairly new addition to the world of fiction and there are some great authors writing in this genre. For me, however, the best has to be Steve Robinson and his Jefferson Tayte novels. Tayte, a genealogist, tackles the family mysteries that others can’t solve and, more often than not, finds himself in danger when doing so! Even though I have only read these books once, I know that they will definitely be revisited at some point as they are so well-written.

 

 

 

 

 

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