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**BLOG TOUR** The Lost by Simon Beckett

Ten years after the disappearance of his young son, firearms officer Jonah Colley is summoned to the onimously named Slaughter Quay by an old friend. Not knowing what he is going to discover, he finds himself caught up in a huge murder enquiry and, with no other witnesses, is placed firmly on the suspect list. Questioning everything he thought he knew about the previous ten years, Jonah must revisit his past in order to help him make sense of the present.

This is one of those books that instantly grabs your attention and holds it right until the very last page. I have read one of Simon Beckett’s books before (The Scent of Death) and after reading The Lost, I really must read the rest as the story telling is superb and the whole plot is extremely well-written.

In Jonah Colley, the author has created a great lead character, tenacious yet damaged. We see how events in his past have made him the man he is today and I found it easy to feel sympathy towards him. Some of his actions were definitely questionable and he seems to have a knack of getting himself further into bother, but this only endeared him to me even more as I willed him to finally be able to exorcise his demons.

The Lost has an engrossing plot which, at times, has hints of violence. This is all integral to the plot, however, and helped to create tension which left me wanting to read ‘just one more chapter’ before putting the book down!

I am so pleased that this is the first in a series as I am eager to see where Simon Beckett takes onah Colley next.

With thanks to Orion and Tracy Fenton at Compulsive Readers.

**BOOK TOUR** The Forgotten Gun by John Reid

Steve Burt’s time as a police officer is nearly up. Facing disciplinary action, he is surprised to receive a lifeline when he is asked to head a new unit looking at cases that have basically no chance of being solved. Burt and his team of two additional officers are given the ultimate mystery to work on – the murder of a man who has been shot at from a distance. With no witnesses and no physical evidence, it is looking increasingly likely that this case will remain unsolved. Enter Steve and his team…

I was really pleased to be given the opportunity to read The Forgotten Gun, a book that grabbed me straight from the opening chapter. On the surface, this is a crime that is never going to be solved, with a weapon that doesn’t seem to exist and an investigative team full of misfits. We soon learn, though, never to judge a book by its cover as Burt and his two junior officers, ‘Twiggy’ and ‘The Captain’, take on the challenge and finally get the opportunity to show their capabilities.

The plot moves on at a good pace and I liked how there was a big focus on the investigative process, information being gathered in mainly traditional ways. I also really loved the humour in the book and it felt like an accurate portrayal of three people working closely together. Twiggy, in particular, was a character who I really enjoyed and I admired her ‘don’t care’ attitude, determined to use any means necessary to try to solve the case.

The Forgotten Gun was a great read and one that I would recommend, especially if you’re looking for something not particularly lengthy.

With thanks to Kelly at Love Books Tours.

**BLOG TOUR** The Room in the Attic by Louise Douglas

In 1903, a woman is found by some fisherman, badly beaten, accompanied by her young daughter. They are taken to All Hallows, an asylum on Dartmoor where the woman falls into a coma, but her young daughter, Harriet, is taken to an attic room in the care of Nurse Emma Everdeen.

Ninety years later, in 1993, after the death of his mother, young Lewis Tyler is sent to All Hallows, which is now a boarding school. Finding a kindred spirit in Isak, they find out about Nurse Everdeen and her charge and soon they are determined to find out what happened back in 1903.

The introduction to the book grabbed me instantly as we see Lewis Tyler, in the present day, visiting All Hallows as part of his work. It is clear to see that he has a past with this building and we are left with a hint as to what it may be. This took us nicely to the two timeframes that form the majority of the book, Lewis featuring in the events of 1993.

I liked the character of Lewis immediately and had great sympathy towards his plight. An outsider, it was good to see him find a friend in Isak, another boy with a troubled life. I enjoyed the scenes they shared as they tried to discover the mystery behind the strange noises coming from the room above theirs – was it their imagination or something a bit more ghostly?

The part of the story set in 1903 had a huge sense of foreboding. Nurse Everdeen was a character who grew on me as the book progressed, her story tugging at the heartstrings on more than one occasion. Louise Douglas paints a very damning picture of life at the asylum and I almost felt relieved that Nurse Everdeen was in her claustrophobic room in the attic.

There were numerous shocks along the way, the denouement being a very pleasant surprise. I like it when a book suddenly takes you somewhere you were not expecting and The Room in the Attic definitely does this! This is an engrossing multi-genre read that kept me gripped right until the end.

With thanks to Boldwood Books and Rachel’s Random Resources.


**BLOG TOUR** Little Bones by Patricia Gibney

Detective Lottie Parker finds herself investigating a particularly harrowing case when Isabel Gallagher is found brutally murdered on the floor of her baby’s nursery, her hand clutching a razor blade. When another young mother goes missing, Lottie fears that the cases are connected and that more lives may be put in danger. With little evidence to go on, the Ragmullin detectives have a race against time to find out just what links the women and find the person responsible.

Patricia Gibney’s Lottie Parker series is one that I have enjoyed since the first book and Little Bones, the tenth instalment, is no exception. It is always nice to reacquaint myself with Lottie and the rest of her team and the author has excelled herself with this exciting and fast-paced plot.

As always, the plot grabs you straight away, with a mysterious incident that occurred some time in the past. I love a prologue that makes you think and this definitely worked for me as I spent the rest of the book trying to work out how this event linked to what was happening in the present day. This was followed by a particularly horrible murder that really pulled on the heart strings, setting the scene for what is a very gripping story, at times tense and emotional.

Lottie is a great character who also feels real to me. Her family take more of a back seat in this book than in some of the others, although it is always nice to spend some time with Lottie’s mum, Rose, a character who always has some of the best lines! Lottie is clearly still feeling the impact of previous events and, judging by a revelation in Little Bones, there is still more to come in the future.

If you’ve never read any of these books then this could be read as a standalone although I would advise starting from the beginning as it is such a good series.

With thanks to Bookouture and Net Galley for my ARC and to Sarah Hardy for organising the blog tour.

**Blog Tour** The Man on Hackpen Hill by J S Monroe

Crop circles often appear in Wiltshire but this one on Hackpen Hill is a bit different: the patterns seem to be trying to convey a message and the dead body in the middle is certainly not a common feature. DI Silas Hart is at a loss until he happens upon Jim, a Porton Down scientist who is convinced he is being pursued by MI5 for wanting to tell the truth about what is happening at the government laboratory. With Bella, a trainee journalist intent on telling Jim’s story, someone is desperate to stop the truth being told and is prepared to kill to achieve their aim.

This is an intense read that grabs you right from the very beginning and keeps you hooked until the last page. There is a lot going on with elements of mystery, thriller and police procedural but the short pacy chapters keep you gripped, making you want to read ‘just one more’ before putting it down. It is really well-researched and I do not claim to understand all of the science, but this did not hamper my understanding or enjoyment of the plot in any way.

There are two sets of main characters, each with a distinctive role in the plot. In Jim and Bella, we have like-minded people who have been thrown together by an unknown person, each of them reliant upon the other. I genuinely feared for Jim’s safety throughout the book as it becomes apparent that he seems to have information on what message the crop circles are trying to convey. Likewise, as Bella became more and more embroiled in Jim’s world, her well-being became more of a concern, especially as other aspects of her life start to become more worrying. I admired the courage of Jim and Bella; Jim in particular was a favourite character.

I loved the relationship between the two main police characters and enjoyed how the focus was very much on their part in the investigation and not on their private lives. I feel that there is scope for DI Hart and DC Strover to appear in another book so I hope it’s not the last we see of them.

I thoroughly enjoyed the intelligent plot of The Man on Hackpen Hill and found myself drawn into the plot, desperate to see if my theories were correct! A great read.

With thanks to Lauren Tavella from Head of Zeus for my copy.


**BOOK BLITZ** Unknown Vengeance by Pat O’Brien #AD

For anyone, like me, who enjoys a good serial killer novel, this might be right up your street! Published today by Cayelle Publishing/Whistler, if you like a book with a bit of a puzzle attached, then read on…

The Blurb

A serial killer is terrorizing members of the medical community in Buffalo, NY. Veteran Detective, Rhody Richardson, is leading the investigation with his partner, Detective Wayne. Victims have been disfigured and tortured – faces sliced, numbers carved into their chests. The brilliant, but young, forensic intern, Connor Patrick, tries desperately to make sense of the numbers but cannot find a pattern.

The killer has promised ten victims, but Richardson, and psychiatric consultant Dr. Kaileen Taylor believe it will continue well past that number. At each of the gruesome crime scenes, the killer has left cryptic poems with different names. Richardson ventures down a dangerous path, deciphering what the killer is trying to tell them before they escape justice into the eternal void of the unknown.

If this looks like something you would enjoy, it can be purchased here.

With thanks to Kelly at Love Books Group and Cayelle Publishers.

**BLOG TOUR** The Clockmaker’s Wife by Daisy Wood

London, 1940: After their house is destroyed in the Blitz, Nell Spelman flees to the countryside with her baby, Alice, leaving her husband, Arthur behind. Arthur has an important job to do – he is one of the men tasked with keeping the Great Clock at Westminster working and the famous Big Ben chiming.

New York, Present Day: When Ellie discovers a watch belonging to a grandmother she never met, she embarks on an investigation to find out more about her family’s past. When another discovery shocks her to the core, she begins to wonder whether she really wants to know the truth.

The first thing I would like to say about The Clockmaker’s Wife is how pleased I was that the blurb does not give away too much of the plot. Enough to grab my attention, I found myself instantly engrossed in the story, wondering where the author was going to take us. The World War Two setting opens up so many potential twists and turns and we definitely have many of them here!

Although this is told in two time frames, it was the chapters set during World War Two that were the strongest for me as this was where the core of the plot took place. All aspects of the war were covered from the Blitz to evacuation, rationing to the changing role of women. There is a huge element of mystery and intrigue making up the focus for both time frames which was exciting and at times, highly emotive.

The Clockmaker’s Wife is a well-written piece of historical fiction which kept me gripped right until the end and I will definitely be looking out for more books by this author.

With thanks to Ellie Pilcher for organising the blog tour and to Avon and Net Galley for my copy.

***BLOG TOUR*** The Rule by David Jackson

Chaos ensues when Daniel, not realising his own strength, unwittingly kills a man. His parents know that if the murder is discovered, their vulnerable son will be taken away and will be unable to cope away from everything he knows. Disposing of the body, they hope that it is all done and dusted but little do they know that this is only the beginning. With the police closing in and others with less than honourable intentions looking for them, just how far will they go to protect Daniel?

David Jackson is one of my favourite authors and his previous book, The Resident, was one of my favourite books of last year. The Rule is another standalone, filled with the great writing and dark humour that I have grown to expect from this author.

Daniel is an absolute delight and, although there are other people we see more of, he is the character that, in my opinion, has the most impact. I spent the book willing him to be safe and hoping that his father could do whatever he had to do to protect him.

Daniel’s father, Scott, is another fantastic character. A good man who would do anything for his family, we see how one unfortunate event can change everything you once believed in. He is far from being a criminal mastermind, his naivety showing throughout the book as he gets himself into some terrifying situations. This is where David Jackson’s wonderful writing comes to the fore, turning some genuinely tense moments into humour in the blink of an eye.

It is always a pleasure to read a David Jackson book and The Rule is no exception. Fast paced and exciting with a plethora of well-written, believable characters, this deserves to be a huge hit!

With thanks to Sahina Bibi for organising the blog tour and to viper Books and Net Galley for my ARC.

Take a look at my reviews of some of David Jackson’s other books:

A Tapping at My Door

Hope to Die

Don’t Make a Sound

Your Deepest Fear

The Resident

**BLOG TOUR** The Serial Killer’s Wife by Alice Hunter

Beth and Tom Hardcastle live in the sort of village where everyone knows everyone else’s business. It doesn’t take long, therefore, for news to travel when the police appear at Beth’s door. Thinking that something bad has happened to her husband, Beth is shocked when she is told that Tom is helping them with their enquiries into the disappearance and possible murder of his former girlfriend. As the evidence begins to mount, Beth begins to wonder how much she actually knows her husband. The villagers have other nagging doubts, though: surely as his wife, Beth must have suspected… mustn’t she?


This debut from Alice Hunter takes the traditional serial killer book and turns it on its head by not having its focus on the perpetrator or the police investigation. As the title suggests, we see most of the story from the perspective of Beth, a woman with a successful cafe, a young daughter and a seemingly loving husband. We soon realise however that, despite her ‘perfect’ life, she appears quite lonely with no family and no real friends. This adds to the devastation when her husband is arrested as she doesn’t really have anyone close who she can turn to. I liked how the author developed the character of Beth and enjoyed reading a book about the killer’s wife rather than the killer – something I haven’t read about in many books.

It is no spoiler to reveal that Tom is a killer as this is more than suggested in the title of the book, so the focus isn’t on if he did it but whether or not there is evidence to prove it. As the book progresses, we find out more about his life before he met Beth, building up a complete picture of the character that is trying to prove his innocence. I liked how, as a reader, there is no ambiguity about his character, but we have nagging doubts about Beth. Has she been covering up for him or did she genuinely not know?


The Serial Killer’s Wife is a slow burner of a book, but this does not mean that it is not a gripping read – far from it! I raced through it, eagerly awaiting the outcome and was totally taken aback by the twist at the end. This is one of those books where you know something is coming, but can’t figure out what and Alice Hunter keeps us waiting right until the end to hit us with something that will truly make you gasp.


This is a superb debut and, on the strength of this, I can’t wait to read Alice Hunter’s next book.


With thanks to Ellie Pilcher and Eleanor Slater at Avon for my ARC and for organising the blog tour.





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