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Monthly Round Up

Monthly Round Up – December 2021

I managed to read more books in December than I did in any other month, largely due to finally succumbing to Covid and having a lot of isolation time. I was grateful to have my Kindle! The TBR pile has grown considerably, however!

Books I Have Read

The Wind Chime by Alexandra Walsh

A timeslip novel set partly in the Victorian era and partly in the present day, I’d been looking forward to reading this since enjoying the Marquess House books by the same author.


Darkness Falls by Robert Bryndza

The third in the Kate Marshall series grabbed me straight away and the twisty plot kept me hooked until the end. My favourite in the series so far.


The Appeal by Janice Hallett

I can see why this book has received so much praise! Its novel format, the plot being told in the form of emails and messages, really kept me engaged throughout the whole book.


The Foundlings by Nathan Dylan Goodwin

The latest in the Morton Farrier series sees the forensic genealogist investigating the case of several babies that were found abandoned in shop doorways. Mystery, murder, mayhem… this book has it all!


The Girl From Bletchley Park by Kathleen McGurl

The latest dual timeframe novel from Kathleen McGurl is, as the name suggests, set partly in Bletchley Park during World War Two. A superb read about betrayal.

The Twyford Code by Janice Hallett

Like her previous book, The Appeal, the author tells the story in a novel way, this time in the form of voice messages left on a phone. What did happen to a school teacher who took her class on a field trip never to return?


Gangsta Granny Strikes Again by David Walliams

This sequel doesn’t have the same impact as the first in the series but children will love it nonetheless. some of the well-loved characters return along with the infamous Black Cat.


Mind Games by Neville Southall

This insightful look into issues faced by footballers and the wider world in general is well-written and researched and deals with issues such as racism, mental health and homophobia.



The Body Beneath the Willows by Nick Louth

The latest in the Craig Gillard series sees the detective investigating the discovery of a body with part of an Anglo Saxon dagger lodged in his neck. Is it the body of a long-missing man or is something else afoot?



Books I Have Aquired

Brighton, 1965

When theatrical impresario Bert Billington is found dead in his retirement home, no one suspects foul play. But when the postmortem reveals that he was poisoned, suspicion falls on his wife, eccentric ex-Music Hall star Verity Malone.

Frustrated by the police response to Bert’s death and determined to prove her innocence, Verity calls in private detective duo Emma Holmes and Sam Collins. This is their first real case, but as luck would have it they have a friend on the inside: Max Mephisto is filming a remake of Dracula, starring Seth Billington, Bert’s son. But when they question Max, they feel he isn’t telling them the whole story.

Emma and Sam must vie with the police to untangle the case and bring the killer to justice. They’re sure the answers must lie in Bert’s dark past and in the glamorous, occasionally deadly, days of Music Hall. But the closer they get to the truth, the more danger they find themselves in…

BAFTA-winning actor, voice of everything from Monkey to the Cadbury’s Caramel Rabbit, creator of a myriad of unforgettable characters from Lady Whiteadder to Professor Sprout, MIRIAM MARGOLYES, OBE, is the nation’s favourite (and naughtiest) treasure. Now, at the age of 80, she has finally decided to tell her extraordinary life story – and it’s well worth the wait.

Find out how being conceived in an air-raid gave her curly hair; what pranks led to her being known as the naughtiest girl Oxford High School ever had; how she ended up posing nude for Augustus John as a teenager; why Bob Monkhouse was the best (male) kiss she’s ever had; and what happened next after Warren Beatty asked ‘Do you fuck?’

From declaring her love to Vanessa Redgrave to being told to be quiet by the Queen, this book is packed with brilliant, hilarious stories. With a cast list stretching from Scorsese to Streisand, a cross-dressing Leonardo di Caprio to Isaiah Berlin, This Much Is True is as warm and honest, as full of life and surprises, as its inimitable author.


On the tree-lined banks of Surrey’s River Wey, a decaying corpse is dug up by workmen in the middle of an Anglo-Saxon burial site. His modern dental fillings show that this is no Dark Age corpse…

DCI Craig Gillard is called in, but the body’s condition makes identification difficult. One man, however, seems to fit the bill: Ozzy Blanchard, a contractor employed by the same water firm doing the digging who disappeared six months ago, his crashed company car found nearby.

But then an X-ray of the corpse throws the investigation into turmoil. A shard of metal lodged in his neck turns out to be part of an Anglo-Saxon dagger unknown to archaeologists. Who wielded this mystery weapon and why? Does the answer lie in a murderous feud between two local families?

The deeper Gillard digs, the more shocking truths he will uncover.


A DEVOTED MOTHER
Sam Cooper has a happy life: a good job, a blossoming relationship. Yet, there’s something he can never forget – the image seared into his mind of his mother, Laurie, dying when he was a child. His father allowed his grief to tear them apart and Sam hasn’t seen him in years.

A LOVING WIFE
Until an unexpected call from Firwood hospital, asking Sam to come home, puts in motion a chain of devastating events. On his deathbed, Sam’s father makes a shocking confession.

A LIAR?
Who was Laurie Cooper? It’s clear that everything Sam thought he knew about his mother was wrong. And now he’s determined to find out exactly what she did and why – whatever the cost.

What happens if you discover you’ve been lied to by your own family for twenty-five years?

Sam Cooper is about to find out.


A coffin is dug up by builders in the grounds of an historic convent – inside is the body of a young nun.

In a city as old as London, the discovery is hardly surprising. But when scratch marks are found on the inside of the coffin lid, Detective Jane Tennison believes she has unearthed a mystery far darker than any she’s investigated before.

However, not everyone agrees. Tennison’s superiors dismiss it as an historic cold case, and the Church seems desperate to conceal the facts from the investigation.

It’s clear that someone is hiding the truth, and perhaps even the killer. Tennison must pray she can find both – before they are buried forever . . .

Here’s to a great 2022!


Monthly Round Up: November 2021

Late this month, but here are the books I have read/acquired over the course of November!

Books I Have Read

Mr Crippen, Cora and the Body in the Basement by Matthew Coniam

A well-researched book exploring the infamous case of the alleged murder of Cora Crippen by her husband in London in 1910. Taking into account recent DNA evidence, this book offers a lot of pause for thought.


The Forgotten Gun by John Reid

I really enjoyed this story of a group of misfit police officers who investigate a seemingly impossible set of murders. The plot moves along nicely and provides some laughs along the way.


The Lost by Simon Beckett

The first in the Jonah Colley series is a fast-paced tale of murder and introduces us to the detective who feels he has nothing to lose when investigating a case very close to his heart. A great read!


Stolen Ones by Angela Marsons

I don’t know how she does it, but every book by Angela Marsons is an absolute joy to read! When a man walks into the police station and confesses that he may have information about a missing girl, DI Kim Stone ends up involved in a frustrating case of murder and abduction. Superb!


Books I Have Aquired

Pembrokeshire, Wales, 2020

Serious illness has forced Eleanor Wilder to leave her life in London, close her antique shop, and return to the family farm in Pembrokeshire. Her instinct is to hide from the world but when her parents bring her to a family reunion at the nearby house, Cliffside, she is transfixed by a set of old family photographs.

One of the images is of a woman in theatrical dress, labelled ‘Esme Blood’ – a name that is familiar to Eleanor through a set of Victorian tarot cards and diaries that she found through her shop. Certain the name is unusual enough not to be a coincidence, Eleanor begins to research the life of this intriguing woman.

London, England, 1875

Born to a teenage mother who couldn’t cope, Esme Blood is adopted by the ebullient Cornelius and Rosie Hardy into a touring theatrical troupe, along with her friend Aaron. When Aaron’s grandparents return to claim him, Esme is devastated and the two promise they will find each other.

Outgrowing her adopted lifestyle, Esme decides to set out to seek her fortune, and she relies on a deck of Tarot cards to direct her. But fate can be a cruel mistress, and before long Esme finds herself trapped in a loveless marriage.

Did Esme find happiness? Was she ever reunited with Aaron?

And will researching her family history bring healing to Eleanor…?


It’s time to solve the murder of the century…

Forty years ago, Steven Smith found a copy of a famous children’s book by disgraced author Edith Twyford, its margins full of strange markings and annotations. Wanting to know more, he took it to his English teacher Miss Iles, not realising the chain of events that he was setting in motion. Miss Iles became convinced that the book was the key to solving a puzzle, and that a message in secret code ran through all Twyford’s novels. Then Miss Iles disappeared on a class field trip, and Steven has no memory of what happened to her.

Now, out of prison after a long stretch, Steven decides to investigate the mystery that has haunted him for decades. Was Miss Iles murdered? Was she deluded? Or was she right about the code? And is it still in use today?

Desperate to recover his memories and find out what really happened to Miss Iles, Steven revisits the people and places of his childhood. But it soon becomes clear that Edith Twyford wasn’t just a writer of forgotten children’s stories. The Twyford Code has great power, and he isn’t the only one trying to solve it…


Happy reading!

Monthly Round Up: October 2021

Not a productive month on the reading front and, for the first time, I’m behind on my Goodreads challenge! Hopefully I can get back on track in November!

Books I Have Read

The Room in the Attic by Louise Douglas

A great multi-genre read that I really enjoyed. Set partly in 1903 and partly in 1993, The Room in the Attic tells the tale of an old asylum that is now a boarding school. A perfect autumn read for anyone who enjoys reading dual timeline novels.



Lying Ways by Rachel Lynch

The ninth book in the Kelly Porter series is my favourite so far. When two former prison inmates are found brutally murdered, the detective has a different sort of case on her hands. Fast-paced and exciting, this was an excellent read.




Books I Have Aquired

25 years ago he took a girl. Today he takes another.

One August afternoon, eight-year-old Grace Lennard skips into the garden of the childcare centre she attends and vanishes into thin air.

Hours before, Steven Harte walks into Halesowen police station and confesses to having information that will lead Detective Kim Stone to Melody Jones – the little girl who was taken from a playground exactly twenty-five years ago. But something about his confession is off and Kim dismisses his claims.

Arriving at the scene of Grace’s disappearance, Kim finds a chilling piece of evidence: the heart bracelet belonging to Melody. Now Kim must play Steven’s twisted game if she is to find Grace alive. But they’re going to play by Kim’s rules.

With only twenty-four hours to make every second of Steven’s interrogation count, and scan his behaviour for hidden clues, Kim and her team soon link Steven to the abduction of several vulnerable girls – two were kept for a year and then released, unharmed – but where are Melody and the others?

Then small bones are discovered in the grounds of a local park, and Kim fears the worst.

Kim may be close to convicting a killer, but there’s another who wants revenge against her – Dr Alex Thorne – the evil woman Kim did her best to keep behind bars. Alex is about to reveal a shocking secret to Kim that will hit her where it hurts the most. And if Kim lets Alex mess with her head, she might not be able to save Grace and find the other missing girls in time.


Kate Marshall’s detective agency takes off when she and her partner Tristan are hired to investigate a cold case from over a decade ago. Twelve years previously, a determined young journalist called Joanna Duncan exposed a political scandal that had major repercussions. In the fallout she disappeared without trace and was never found.

When Kate and Tristan examine the case files, they find the trail long cold, but they discover the names of two young men who also vanished at that time. As she begins to connect their last days, Kate realizes that Joanna may have been onto something far more sinister than anyone first believed: the identity of a serial killer preying on the people who few will ever miss.

But the closer Kate comes to finding the killer, the darker things become . . .





A Metropolitan Police detective about to be dismissed is given a second chance by his old boss, who is now a police commander. He’s given a new unit to run and two misfit detectives to assist him. All three know their status is temporary.

Their first case together is an impossible double murder. Each murder is identical. Both victims are expertly shot in the head from long range, but the post-mortems reveal no bullets were used in the shootings. The CSI teams calculate that in both cases there was no place for the marksman to have fired from, unless suspended over busy roads.

Although it’s a case apparently impossible to solve, DCI Steve Burt reluctantly agrees to investigate with his new team. Their enquiries lead them into the murky world of greed, corruption, fraud and money laundering, but they are no nearer solving the murders.

The team is stumped until the DCI meets a retired army major and a WW2 veteran who unwittingly hold the keys to solving these impossible murders.


I’ve got a couple of blog tours I’m participating in during Novermber so I’d better get reading!

Monthly Round Up: September 2021

This month’s round up is a bit late and I haven’t managed to read much during September. Hopefully that will be remedied during October!

Books I Have Read

Little Bones by Patricia Gibney

A harrowing case with a plot that grabs you immediately when a woman is found brutally murdered, her young child only yards away. The Detective Lottoe Parker series has become one of my ‘must reads’ and this one did not disappoint.


The Man Who Died Twice by Richard Osman

The second in the Thursday Murder Club series sees the elderly detectives taking on a case personal to one of their own. I enjoyed this tale of murder, diamond thieves and mobsters more than the first, even of you do have to suspend belief a little!


When the Guilty Cry by M J Lee

The seventh in the DI Thomas Ridpath series is probably one of my favourites to date with the coroner’s officer investigating the discovery of three severed hands and their link to a closed children’s home. Well-written and very authentic.


Books I Have Acquired

A child who does not know her name…

In 1903 fishermen find a wrecked boat containing a woman, who has been badly beaten, and a young girl. An ambulance is sent for, and the two survivors are taken to All Hallows, the imposing asylum, hidden deep on Dartmoor. The woman remains in a coma, but the little girl, Harriet, awakens and is taken to an attic room, far away from the noise of the asylum, and is put in the care of Nurse Emma Everdeen.

Two motherless boys banished to boarding school…

In 1993, All Hallows is now a boarding school. Following his mother’s death and his father’s hasty remarriage, Lewis Tyler is banished to Dartmoor, stripped of his fashionable clothes, shorn of his long hair, and left feeling more alone than ever. There he meets Isak, another lost soul, and whilst refurbishment of the dormitories is taking place, the boys are marooned up in the attic, in an old wing of the school.

Cries and calls from the past that can no longer be ignored…

All Hallows is a building full of memories, whispers, cries from the past. As Lewis and Isak learn more about the fate of Harriet, and Nurse Emma’s desperate fight to keep the little girl safe, it soon becomes clear there are ghosts who are still restless.

Are they ghosts the boys hear at night in the room above, are they the unquiet souls from the asylum still caught between the walls? And can Lewis and Isak bring peace to All Hallows before the past breaks them first…


Will love lead her to a devastating choice?

1942. Three years into the war, Pam turns down her hard-won place at Oxford University to become a codebreaker at Bletchley Park. There, she meets two young men, both keen to impress her, and Pam finds herself falling hard for one of them. But as the country’s future becomes more uncertain by the day, a tragic turn of events casts doubt on her choice – and Pam’s loyalty is pushed to its limits…
 
Present day. Julia is struggling to juggle her career, two children and a husband increasingly jealous of her success. Her brother presents her with the perfect distraction: forgotten photos of their grandmother as a young woman at Bletchley Park. Why did her grandmother never speak of her time there? The search for answers leads Julia to an incredible tale of betrayal and bravery – one that inspires some huge decisions of her own…


I’m reading The Room in the Attic at the moment and am already intrigued!

Monthly Round Up – August 2021

August brought a range of books for me and I acquired some of the books I’ve been looking forward to reading.

Books I Have Read

The Chain by Adrian McKinty

When a young girl is abducted, it sets a chain of events in motion. To get her back, her mum must pay a ransom and find a replacement child. A great premise for a novel with some shocking moments.




The Devil’s Advocate by Steve Cavanagh

The latest in the Eddie Flynn series deals with corrupt law enforcement and racism amongst other controversial topics. This is a series that just gets better and better!


Brass Lives by Chris Nickson

The year is 1913 and Leeds detective Tom Harper is back investigating a string of crimes unlike anything he has ever seen before. Guns and American gangsters along with trauma in his personal life make this a very testing case for Tom.


The Man on Hackpen Hill by J S Monroe

This multi-genre book had me gripped from beginning to end. A man is found dead in the middle of a crop circle with a coded message that Porton Down scientist, Jim, seems to understand. What is the meaning behind the death and why is Jim fearing for his life? My review will form part of the forthcoming blog tour.


Put a Paper Towel on It by Lee & Adam Parkinson

A very funny and accurate portrayal of life in a primary school. From the staffroom, school trips, lessons and not forgetting the children, this is a must-read for all teachers and parents. Review to follow.

Books I Have Acquired

It’s the following Thursday.

Elizabeth has received a letter from an old colleague, a man with whom she has a long history. He’s made a big mistake, and he needs her help. His story involves stolen diamonds, a violent mobster, and a very real threat to his life.

As bodies start piling up, Elizabeth enlists Joyce, Ibrahim and Ron in the hunt for a ruthless murderer. And if they find the diamonds too? Well, wouldn’t that be a bonus?

But this time they are up against an enemy who wouldn’t bat an eyelid at knocking off four septuagenarians. Can The Thursday Murder Club find the killer (and the diamonds) before the killer finds them?


A MISSING CHILD

Ten years ago, the disappearance of firearms police officer Jonah Colley’s young son almost destroyed him.

A GRUESOME DISCOVERY

A plea for help from an old friend leads Jonah to Slaughter Quay, and the discovery of four bodies. Brutally attacked and left for dead, he is the only survivor.

A SEARCH FOR THE TRUTH

Under suspicion himself, he uncovers a network of secrets and lies about the people he thought he knew – forcing him to question what really happened all those years ago…


Three severed hands. No clues. A race against time.

Three embalmed hands are discovered in a disused Victorian house. Is it a gangland ritual? The work of a cult? Or just a prank played by Medical Students? And what happened to the bodies?

Meanwhile the Coroner needs to issue a Presumption of Death certificate on a teenage girl who vanished eleven years ago in mysterious circumstances.

As hints emerge the two cases are connected, DI Ridpath pushes himself to the limit to find out what really happened. It soon emerges the house is a former children’s home. When another woman, a local social worker, disappears, he is under immense pressure to find answers. What really happened at Daisy House Children’s Home all those years ago?

He has just one week to discover the truth…


When the danger is already inside, nowhere is safe…

Highton prison sits nestled within the moors of western Cumbria, close to the coastal road. When two former inmates turn up dead, DI Kelly Porter is tasked with finding out why. It soon becomes obvious that she is hunting for one killer and the place where both victims were incarcerated holds the key. As Kelly delves into life at Highton she finds more questions than answers. A web of corruption and deceit emerges within the prison walls.

As Kelly gets closer to unpicking the relationships between the officers and their wards, a full scale prison riot explodes – with police caught in the middle. Kelly now faces a hostage situation with a well-loved member of her team caught in the middle.



In a town full of secrets…
Someone was murdered.
Someone went to prison.
And everyone’s a suspect.
Can you uncover the truth?

Dear Reader – enclosed are all the documents you need to solve a case. It starts with the arrival of two mysterious newcomers to the small town of Lockwood, and ends with a tragic death.

Someone has already been convicted of this brutal murder and is currently in prison, but we suspect they are innocent. What’s more, we believe far darker secrets have yet to be revealed.

Throughout the Fairway Players’ staging of All My Sons and the charity appeal for little Poppy Reswick’s life-saving medical treatment, the murderer hid in plain sight. Yet we believe they gave themselves away. In writing. The evidence is all here, between the lines, waiting to be discovered.

Will you accept the challenge? Can you uncover the truth?



So there you have it! Have you read any of these yet?

Monthly Round Up – July 2021

After finding a bag containing books I had completely forgotten about, I have decided to try to make an effort to read some of the growing TBR pile! As a result, I’m halfway through The Chain by Adrian McKinty, a book I have been wanting to read for a while after hearing such good things about it.

Books I Have Read

The Clockmaker’s Wife by Daisy Wood

This dual timeline novel set partly during World War Two is an engrossing tale of courage, espionage and long lost family. Big Ben will never seem the same again after reading this book!



The Ghost in the Garden by Elly Griffiths

The third in the Justice Jones series will delight children alike. When one of her fellow pupils is kidnapped and a ghostly apparition is seen, Justice has another case to investigate.



Rabbit Hole by Mark Billingham

This standalone from the author of the Tom Thorne books introduces us to Alice, a police officer investigating the murder of a patient at a mental health facility. The only problem is – she is a patient herself. Review to follow.




The Face at the Window by Ruby Speechley

A mother’s worst nightmare comes true when her baby is abducted by someone she thought she knew. This is a gripping book about how we don’t always know what goes on behind closed doors. Review to follow as part of the blog tour.



The Body on the Moor by Nick Louth

The eighth in the Craig Gillard series is a twisty tale of murder and revenge. When the body of a headteacher is found decapitated, police are at a loss to find a motive. His personal life may hold the key but what exactly has been going on? Review to follow.



Books I Have Acquired

A thrilling and perplexing investigation of a true Victorian crime at Dublin railway station.

Dublin, November 1856: George Little, the chief cashier of the Broadstone railway terminus, is found dead, lying in a pool of blood beneath his desk.

He has been savagely beaten, his head almost severed; there is no sign of a murder weapon, and the office door is locked, apparently from the inside. Thousands of pounds in gold and silver are left untouched at the scene of the crime.

Augustus Guy, Ireland’s most experienced detective, teams up with Dublin’s leading lawyer to investigate the murder. But the mystery defies all explanation, and two celebrated sleuths sent by Scotland Yard soon return to London, baffled.

Five suspects are arrested then released, with every step of the salacious case followed by the press, clamouring for answers. But then a local woman comes forward, claiming to know the murderer…



She lifted up her granddaughter from the cot, clutched her to her chest and, without looking at her beautiful daughter lying dead on the floor of her bedroom, ran from the house. Only when she was outside did she let a wail escape her lips, frightening the baby who joined in her screams.

When Isabel Gallagher is found murdered on the floor of her baby’s nursery by her mother, it’s a gruelling case for Detective Lottie Parker. Isabel’s pyjamas have been ripped, her throat cut and an old-fashioned razor blade placed in her hand. As Lottie looks at the round blue eyes and perfect chubby cheeks of Isabel’s baby daughter, she can’t understand who would want to hurt this innocent family.

That very same day she receives a call with devastating news. Another young mother, Joyce Breslin, has gone missing, and her four-year-old son Evan has been abducted from daycare. Lottie is sure that the missing mother and son are linked to Isabel’s death, and when she finds a bloody razor blade in their house, her worst fears are confirmed.

Desperate to find little Evan, Lottie leaves no stone unturned as she delves into Isabel and Joyce’s pasts and when she realises the two women have been meeting in secret, she knows she must find out why.

But when Joyce’s body is found in a murky pond and some little bones are found on a windy hillside, it feels as if this merciless killer will stop at nothing. The bones aren’t Evan’s but can they give Lottie the final clue to find the innocent child before more lives are taken?


I’ve been trying to avoid Net Galley but who knows how long that will last for!

Monthly Round Up – June 2021

Another month over and I’ve read a range of books during June. Net Galley has been utilised quite a bot and I have been pleased to be able to get some books by some of my favourite authors.

Books I Have Read

The Family Tree by Steph Mullin and Nicole Mabry

When Liz Catalano discovers that she has been adopted, she is more that shocked to discover that she is related biologically to a serial killer who has evaded capture for decades. Part genealogical fiction, part serial killer novel, I really enjoyed how this story unfolded.



The Weeping Lady Conspiracy by Alexandra Walsh

A novella that follows on from the Marquess House saga. After a storm uncovers some interesting finds, sisters Piper and Perdita Rivers investigate an age-old ghost story. A great bonus story in a series that I love.



Hunt by Leona Deakin

The third in the Dr Augusta Bloom series is my favourite to date. When she is tasked by the foreign secretary to investigate a shady feminist organisation, Augusta finds herself undercover in what she suspects is a cult. Just how much danger has she put herself in? Review to follow.


Killing for Company by Brian Masters

The book that the TV series Des was based on is a detailed description of the life and crimes of one of Britain’s most notorious serial killers, Dennis Nilsen. The audiobook, read by the actor Jason Watkins, is enthralling and horrific in equal measures. A great read.


The Rule by David Jackson

David Jackson’s latest standalone is full of the dark humour and fantastic characters that I have grown to expect. Telling the story of how a law-abiding person can become embroiled in the world of crime, this unexpected plot is fast paced and incredibly readable.



The Perfect Life by Nuala Ellwood

Vanessa loves taking on the persona of someone else, looking around upmarket houses that she has no intention of buying. Until one of the householders is murdered and she is the prime suspect… This multi-faceted book was a joy to read and deals with some very serious subjects. Review to follow.


Books I Have Acquired

A dangerous American is in town, but is he really responsible for a deadly crime spree in Leeds?

Leeds, June 1913. Deputy Chief Constable Tom Harper is a busy man. He’s overseeing a national suffragist pilgrimage due in Leeds that his wife Annabelle intends to join, and his daughter Mary has exciting plans of her own. Then a letter arrives from police in New York: Davey Mullen, an American gangster born in Leeds, is on his way back to the city, fleeing a bloody gang war.

Despite Tom’s best efforts to keep an eye on him, Davey’s arrival triggers a series of chilling events in the city. Is he responsible for the sudden surge in crime, violence and murder on Leeds’s streets? Facing a mounting workload, Tom must hunt down a cold-blooded killer while also confronting danger and tragedy close to home.




They’re in your house.

They want your life.

And now, they have your baby.

To the world, I’m @HappyWife. Online, people only see my picture-perfect home, my handsome husband, Nick, and my beautiful baby, Thomas.

They don’t see the real Gemma Adams. They don’t see my past, the dark secrets I’m hiding in my marriage. They don’t see the fear I live in every single day.

But I know someone is watching me. And now, they’ve taken Thomas.

I just don’t know why.

But I’m going to stop at nothing to get my baby back.

Even if it destroys everything I’ve got to find him.


My name is Alice. I’m a police officer.
I’m trying to solve a murder on a psychiatric ward.
But I’m also a patient…

They were meant to be safe on Fleet Ward: psychiatric patients monitored, treated, cared for. But now one of their number is found murdered, and the accusations begin to fly.

Was it one of his fellow patients? A member of staff? Or did someone come in from the outside?

DC Alice Armitage is methodical, tireless, and she’s quickly on the trail of the killer.

The only problem is, Alice is a patient too.


It was an ‘open and shut’ case. Hawley Harvey Crippen, an American quack doctor, had murdered his wife, the music hall performer Belle Elmore, and buried parts of her body in the coal cellar of their North London home. But by the time the remains were discovered he had fled the country with his mistress disguised as his son. After a thrilling chase across the ocean he was caught, returned to England, tried and hanged, remembered forever after as the quintessential domestic murderer.

But if it was as straightforward as the prosecution alleged, why did he leave only some of the body in his house, when he had successfully disposed of the head, limbs and bones elsewhere? Why did he stick so doggedly to a plea of complete innocence, when he might have made a sympathetic case for manslaughter? Why did he make no effort to cover his tracks if he really had been planning a murder? These and other questions remained tantalising mysteries for almost a century, until new DNA tests conducted in America exploded everything we thought we knew for sure about the story.

This book, the first to make full use of this astonishing new evidence, considers its implications for our understanding of the case, and suggests where the real truth might lie.


A DEADLY PROSECUTOR

They call him the King of Death Row. Randal Korn has sent more men to their deaths than any district attorney in the history of the United States.

A TWISTED RITUALISTIC KILLING

When a young woman, Skylar Edwards, is found murdered in Buckstown, Alabama, a corrupt sheriff arrests the last person to see her alive, Andy Dubois. It doesn’t seem to matter to anyone that Andy is innocent.

A SMALL TOWN BOILING WITH RAGE

Everyone in Buckstown believes Andy is guilty. He has no hope of a fair trial. And the local defense attorney assigned to represent him has disappeared.

A FORMER CON-ARTIST

Hot shot New York lawyer Eddie Flynn travels south to fight fire with fire. He plans to destroy the prosecutors case, find the real killer and save Andy from the electric chair.

But the murders are just beginning.

Is Eddie Flynn next?

The world is at war. And time is running out…

London, 1940. Britain is gripped by the terror of the Blitz, forcing Nell Spelman to flee the capital with her young daughter – leaving behind her husband, Arthur, the clockmaker who keeps Big Ben chiming. 

When Arthur disappears, Nell is desperate to find him. But her search will lead her into far darker places than she ever imagined… 

New York, Present Day. When Ellie discovers a beautiful watch that had once belonged to a grandmother she never knew, she becomes determined to find out what happened to her. But as she pieces together the fragments of her grandmother’s life, she begins to wonder if the past is better left forgotten… 


Justice Jones, super-smart super-sleuth, is back for her third spine-tingling adventure! For fans of Robin Stevens, Katherine Woodfine and Enid Blyton.

Justice and her friends are third years now and there’s an intriguing new girl in Barnowls. Letitia has never been to school before and doesn’t care for the rules – and the teachers don’t seem to mind! She decides that Justice is her particular friend, much to Stella and Dorothy’s distress. But Letitia just isn’t the kind of girl you say no to.

Then, after a midnight feast in the barn, and a terrifying ghost-sighting in the garden, a girl disappears. Soon ransom notes appear, and they’re torn from the pages of a crime novel.

Where is the schoolgirl and who has taken her? It will take all of Justice’s sleuthing to unravel this mystery!


Every family has their secrets…

Windsor, England, 2019

Amelia Prentice is recovering from the worst two years of her life. First her daughter and then her parents have died, leaving her without any surviving relatives. As she gets ready to put the family home, a vast Victorian house in Windsor, on the market, she fulfils her mother’s last request to clear out the attic, and she discovers a strange box of Victorian photographs.

The photographs are of a large estate in Pembrokeshire called Cliffside, and they feature the Attwater family. When Amelia uncovers the diaries of Osyth Attwater, she realises the family had tragedies of their own…

Pembrokeshire, Wales, 1883

Every summer the Attwater family gather at Cliffside to tell each other stories. The youngest in the house is Osyth, a dreamer and writer who waits eagerly every year for the wind chime in the garden to signal the arrival of her relatives. But her happiness is shattered when she overhears a conversation that tears her world apart.

Raised by her grandparents, she believed her mother, Eudora, had died. But it seems that may not be the case. Desperate to find out the truth, Osyth decides to unravel her family’s secrets. But what she discovers will shock her to her core…

What did Amelia’s mother want her to find out about the Attwater family? Who is Eudora, and what really happened to her?

And how is Amelia connected to it all…?



A good mix there – I can’t wait to find the time to read them all!

Monthly Round Up – May 2021

Slightly late this month – sorry! I’ve found it quite difficult to find the time to read this month as I’ve had little time to myself. I haven’t even managed to acquire many books either!

Books I Have Read


A Poison Tree by J E Mayhew

When a girl is found murdered, her shoes missing, DCI Blake discovers a link to a series of murders forty years previously. Is it a coincidence or is there a connection? With someone apparently on a murderous mission, will the Wirral detectives solve the case before they reach their goal. A great first book in the Will Blake series.



Henry VIII’s Secret Diary by Terry Deary

From the Horrible Histories series, a funny fictional account of Henry VIII’s life that children will love. Discussing all of the main events in his turbulent reign from his wives to the major religious issues, this has great illustrations to accompany the hilarious, yet accurate, text.


The Silent Suspect by Nell Pattison

The third in the Paige Northwood series sees that sign language interpreter trying to help a client who has been accused of murder. Did he do it or is he protecting someone? Paige, once again, puts herself in danger while trying to uncover the truth.


The Serial Killer’s Wife by Alice Hunter

A serial killer story told from the perspective of the wife of the perpetrator, but did she know all along what her husband had done? I really enjoyed this book and the different angle it took.



The Redeemer by Jo Nesbo

The sixth in the Harry Hole series sees the detective investigating the death of a Salvation Army officer. When it becomes clear that the wrong man has been killed, the race is on to find the killer before he strikes again. Review to follow.




Books I Have Acquired

The DNA results are back. And there’s a serial killer in her family tree…

Liz Catalano is shocked when an ancestry kit reveals she’s adopted. But she could never have imagined connecting with her unknown family would plunge her into an FBI investigation of a notorious serial killer…

The Tri-State Killer has been abducting pairs of women for forty years, leaving no clues behind – only bodies.

Can Liz figure out who the killer in her new family is? And can she save his newest victims before it’s too late?





So there you have it! Not a lot going on in May. I’m reading The Family Tree at the moment and am really enjoying trying to figure out the conclusion!

Monthly Round Up – April 2021

I’ve been meaning to start listening to more audiobooks so, this month, I’ve been making use of my local library which has a decent selection online. I find it easier to listen to non-fiction than fiction as I find I don’t need to concentrate as much! I’ve also been trying not to start any new series but when Bloodhound Books made some of their titles available on Kindle for free this month, I couldn’t refuse!

Books I’ve Read

The Girl on the Platform by Bryony Pearce

When a woman witnesses a child being abducted, nobody believes her. Did she really see it or is her mind playing tricks? After initially feeling this was going to be a bit like The Girl on the Train, the plot took a sudden twist, making it one of my favourite reads of the year so far.


The Hound of the Baskervilles by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

This retelling of the classic Sherlock Holmes story for younger readers is another faithful version of the original with great illustrations. Ideal for children who are wanting to start to read classic crime fiction.


Twisted Lies by Angela Marsons

The fourteenth book in the Kim Stone series is one of the darkest to date. When the body of a man is found horrifically tortured, Kim and her team know that they are on the track of a particularly sadistic killer who is seemingly out for revenge. Another fantastic book from the wonderful Angela Marsons.


The Lost Sister by Kathleen McGurl

Another great dual timeline book from the author, this time dealing with the Titanic tragedy and the story of her sister ships. Two stories, over a hundred years apart, link together to provide a heartwarming yet heartbreaking tale of sibling rivalry. Review will follow as part of the blog tour.


The Doctor Will See You Now by Dr Amir Khan

The TV doctor, who is also a full time practitioner, recalls situations from his time as a GP that will make you laugh and cry in equal measures. Definitely a love story about the wonderful NHS.


Did She Kill Him? by Kate Colquhoun

I first read this when it came out but when I saw it was available as an audiobook from my local library, I thought it was time for a re-read. Did Florence Maybrick, a young American, kill her older, cotton merchant husband, James, at their home in Liverpool? Kate Colquhoun provides all the evidence for you to decide.



Books I’ve Acquired

Quiet Places hide dark secrets…

In a small Scottish university town, what links a spate of horrible murders, a targeted bomb explosion and a lecturer’s disappearance? Is a terror group involved? If so, who is pulling the strings? And what does something that happened over forty years ago have to do with it? 

Having recently returned to Castletown in the hope of winning back his estranged wife, DCI Jim Carruthers finds himself up to his eyes in the investigation.

Struggling with a very different personal problem, DS Andrea Fletcher assists Jim in the hunt for the murderous perpetrators. To prevent further violence they must find the answers quickly. But will Jim’s old adversary, terror expert McGhee, be a help or a hindrance?



A detective on the edge. A killer on the loose.

When DCI Bran Reece is called to the bloody crime scene of a murdered woman, he thinks the case is his. 

But the new Chief Superintendent has other ideas. She sees the recently widowed Reece as a volatile risk-taker and puts him on leave, forcing him to watch from the sidelines. Or so she thinks. 

DS Elan Jenkins soon realises her boss’s replacement is out of his depth and takes matters into her own hands. But Elan unknowingly puts herself and others in grave danger.

Can Reece and Jenkins overcome their personal issues and solve the case? 

The truth might be closer to home than either of them is willing to admit…


Katerina Rowe, a Deacon at the church in the sleepy village of Eyam, has a fulfilled life. She is happily married to Leon and her work is rewarding.

But everything changes when she discovers the body of a man and a badly beaten woman, Beth, in the alleyway behind her husband’s pharmacy.

Drawn to the young woman she saved, Kat finds herself embroiled in a baffling mystery.

When Beth’s house is set on fire, Kat offers the young woman sanctuary in her home and soon the pair begin investigating the murder, with some help from Beth’s feisty grandmother, Doris. But neither the police, nor Leon, nor the criminals want Kat and Beth looking into their affairs and the sleuths quickly find themselves out of their depth…

Can Kat and Beth solve the mystery and walk away unscathed?


How can you find someone who doesn’t want to be found?

When Detective Garda Sergeant Mike West is called to investigate a murder in a Dublin graveyard, suspicion immediately falls on a local woman, Edel Johnson, whose husband disappeared some months before. But then she disappears.

Evidence leads West to a small village in Cornwall, but when he checks in to an Inn, he finds Edel has arrived before him. Her explanation seems to make sense but as West begins to think his suspicions of her are unfounded, she disappears again.

Is she guilty? West, fighting an unsuitable attraction, doesn’t want to believe it. But the case against her is growing. Back in Dublin, his team uncover evidence of blackmail and illegal drugs involving Edel’s missing husband. When another man is murdered, she, once again, comes under suspicion.

Finally, the case is untangled, but is it the outcome West really wants?


When a nurse is murdered, Detective David Grant recognises the hallmarks of a serial killer called Travis.

Twenty-five years ago, Grant caught Travis for the murder of five women and the murderer has been incarcerated ever since. The problem is, Travis was at the hospital when the nurse was murdered but he was in the constant custody of two police officers.

Determined to solve the case, Grant recruits a specialist to his team, Ruby Silver, a top criminal profiler. But Ruby is hiding something from her colleagues.

Who is the killer and what is their motive?

Grant and the team must work quickly to solve the case as the body count rises…




MY DAD SAYS BAD THINGS
HAPPEN WHEN I BREAK IT…

Daniel is looking forward to his birthday. He wants pie and chips, a big chocolate cake, and a comic book starring his favourite superhero. And as long as he follows The Rule, nothing bad will happen.

Daniel will be twenty-three next week. And he has no idea that he’s about to kill a stranger.

Daniel’s parents know that their beloved and vulnerable son will be taken away. They know that Daniel didn’t mean to hurt anyone, he just doesn’t know his own strength. They dispose of the body. Isn’t that what any loving parent would do? But as forces on both sides of the law begin to close in on them, they realise they have no option but to finish what they started. Even if it means that others will have to die…

Because they’ll do anything to protect Daniel. Even murder.


Quite a few new authors for me to read in the coming months. Has anyone read any of these books? What did you think?

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