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The Thursday Murder Club

The Man Who Died Twice by Richard Osman

The Thursday Murder Club are back and Elizabeth has received a letter from an old colleague that immediately piques her interest. Forced to revisit an earlier part of her life, she finds herself involved in a dangerous case involving diamond thieves, mobsters and murder. With her friends, and fellow club members, Joyce, Ibrahim and Ron ready to assist, will they be able to crack the case before too many people die?

The Thursday Murder Club was one of last year’s hit novels, ideal for anyone who likes their crime a little less gruesome! The follow up, The Man Who Died Twice, is more of the same, albeit with a slightly harder edge at times. This is one of those books where you have to suspend reality for a while and just enjoy it for what it is – a humorous crime story with great characters and an engaging plot that gives the older generation top billing.

The humour mainly comes from Joyce, a charming character who is attempting to move with the times by setting up her own Instagram account. I was pleased to see that a real account has been set up and I hope that the author develops this further, giving us an insight into the lives of the Thursday Murder Club.

There is one incredibly moving part of the plot involving Ibrahim which I thought was sensitively written and true-to-life. This really brought home the problems faced by the elderly and, although it was dealt with in true Thursday Murder Club fashion, I had so much sympathy for Ibrahim and I hope he returns to his old self in the next book.

I really enjoyed The Man Who Died Twice, even more than the previous book in the series. If you are looking for an easy crime read and can suspend reality for a while, then I can highly recommend it.

With thanks to Net Galley and Penguin for my copy.

Monthly Round Up – August 2020

I thought I would have managed more books this month but I found that despite having more time to myself than in previous months, I didn’t actually read a great deal! I’ve got some great books to read in September, so I’m hoping to get through some of that TBR pile!

Books I’ve Read

Grave’s End by William Shaw

Murder and environmental activism combine in the third book in the DS Alexandra Cupidi series. A complex, very readable plot and the first time I’ve read chapters penned by a badger… It’s not as daft as it seems!

 

Lost Cause by Rachel Lynch

The eighth book in the Kelly Porter series has a particularly dark plot about the abduction and imprisonment of young women. This has become one of my favourite crime series, and this is one of the best so far.

 

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

A cosy mystery (albeit one with some gruesome murders) and a cast of unforgettable characters, this promises to be one of the hit novels of the year. A brilliant read.

 

Close to the Bone by Susan Wilkins

The second in the series to feature Megan Thomas sees the detective investigating the murder of a local businessman whilst also working alongside the NCA on a case involving human trafficking. This is promising to be a great series. Review to follow as part of the blog tour.

 

The Smuggler’s Daughter by Kerry Barrett

This dual timeline book set in present day Cornwall and the same place in 1799 is a wonderful mystery story about smuggling and revenge. Review to follow as part of the blog tour.

 

Books I’ve Acquired

The past is never over. It’s just waiting for an opportunity to return…

When the notorious serial killer the Beast of Manchester was captured, the streets should have been safe. Except the police got the wrong man. An innocent person was convicted, and only later was the culprit put away.

Now, those connected to the case are being targeted. Someone wants revenge. DI Thomas Ridpath has to relive the horrors all over again. As the bodies stack up once more, Ridpath knows the answers lie in the mistakes made the first time round.

But as he is searching for clues from years ago, fresh terror awaits. While Ridpath seeks to save lives, he risks overlooking the greatest danger of all – and losing more than he can stand.

 

‘He’s gone…’

When his daughter Samantha calls in the dead of night, John Rebus knows it’s not good news. Her husband has been missing for two days.

Rebus fears the worst – and knows from his lifetime in the police that his daughter will be the prime suspect.

He wasn’t the best father – the job always came first – but now his daughter needs him more than ever. But is he going as a father or a detective?

As he leaves at dawn to drive to the windswept coast – and a small town with big secrets – he wonders whether this might be the first time in his life where the truth is the one thing he doesn’t want to find…

 

10 Rillington Place: the house of death.

John Reginald Halliday Christie and Timothy John Evans were hanged after a series of brutal murders in the 1940s and 1950s.

But should they both have been executed?

The sole survivor who grew up with Christie and Evans tells the untold story of what really happened inside 10 Rillington Place…

 

 

 

He is my husband.
To honour and obey.
Until murder do us part.

London, 1888: Susannah rushes into marriage to a young and wealthy surgeon. After a passionate honeymoon, she returns home with her new husband wrapped around her little finger. But then everything changes. His behaviour becomes increasingly volatile and violent. He stays out all night, returning home bloodied and full of secrets.

Lonely and frustrated, Susannah starts following the gruesome reports of a spate of murders in Whitechapel. But as the killings continue, her mind takes her down the darkest path imaginable. Every time her husband stays out late, another victim is found dead.

Is it coincidence? Or is he the man they call Jack the Ripper?

 

Things can’t get much worse for detective Jane Tennison.

Unceremoniously kicked off the adrenaline-fuelled Flying Squad, she’s been relegated to Gerald Road, a small and sleepy police station in the heart of London’s affluent Knightsbridge.

With only petty crime to sink her teeth into, Tennison can feel her career slowly flatlining. That is until the discovery of the most brutal murder Jane has ever seen: Charlie Foxley has been found viciously beaten to death, his body dismembered and disembowelled.

As a big-time showbiz agent, Foxley had a lot of powerful friends – but even more enemies. And alongside her old friend DS Spencer Gibbs, Tennison must journey into the salacious world of show business to find the killer, before they strike again . . .

In Lynda La Plante’s most gripping thriller yet, Tennison discovers that the brightest lights hide the darkest secrets – and the killer doesn’t always hide in the shadows . . .

 

I’m currently reading, and enjoying, Blunt Force – I don’t think I’ve ever read a bad book by Lynda La Plante! Are any of these on your TBR list?

 

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

Once a week, four like-minded residents of a retirement village meet to discuss real-life murder cases. The Thursday Murder Club, as they are known, soon find themselves embroiled in something a lot closer to home, however, when a local property developer is killed after attending a meeting at their residence, Coopers Chase. With their unorthodox way of obtaining information, these four pensioners are determined to get to the bottom of this awful crime.

After hearing Richard Osman (one of the presenters on BBC’s Pointless) on the Two Crime Writers and a Microphone podcast, I knew that he had an interest in crime fiction, so when I saw that he had written a book himself, I was immediately interested. 

The Thursday Murder Club introduces us to four friends, Elizabeth, Joyce, Ibrahim and Ron who are not your typical pensioners! Residing in a retirement village, they have access to case files of unsolved murders from the past and, once a week, meet to discuss, and try to solve, the crimes. Each of their characters brings their own special skills to the table, Elizabeth being the driving force behind the group. My favourite, however, was, Ibrahim, an elderly gentleman who has moved with the times and has embraced technology, even if he can sometimes bore his friends when trying to explain how things work!

There are a plethora of supporting characters throughout the book, providing numerous twists and turns along the way. While the plot is certainly a good one, and one that keeps you guessing throughout, for me, it is the characterization that is the main selling point of The Thursday Murder Club. Most of the people in the book are incredibly likable, each with their own stories that help you to build up a complete picture of their lives. Richard Osman’s humour also shines through in each of them, and even the not-so-nice characters are well-written. 

After reading The Thursday Murder Club, I do hope that this is not a one-off for Richard Osman and that we get to read other books of this genre. With its gentle humour, out-of-the-ordinary characters and nostalgia that we can all relate to, this is a great read and one that, I am sure, will be a huge hit. I just hope that, in the future, if I have to go to a retirement village, there is room at Coopers Chase for me!

With thanks to Penguin Books (UK) and Net Galley for my ARC.

 

 

 

Monthly Round Up – July 2020

This month, I’ve read a couple of books from my favourite authors and have been introduced to some new writers. I’d been pleased that I managed to get my Net Galley shelf down to just a few books but with some of the books I’ve been looking forward to appearing on there this month, I have succumbed once again! 

Books I Have Read

The Dead Tell Lies by J F Kirwan

Criminal psychologist Greg Adams specialises in hunting down serial killers but he has his work cut out with his present case. After the murder of his wife, he realises that her death has been attributed to the wrong man. Can he find the real killer before it is too late?

 

The Molten City by Chris Nickson

Leeds, 1908, and Detective Superintendent Tom Harper is awaiting a visit from the Prime Minister. With protests planned by several groups and the cold case investigation of a child who went missing fourteen years previously, the Leeds police department has a lot of work to do to prevent the collapse of law and order.

 

Hush Little Baby by Jane Isaac

Fifteen years ago, a baby went missing from outside a shop and was never seen again. Now,the body of a baby has been discovered, threatening to open up old wounds and revel secrets that have been well-hidden.

 

 

Cry Baby by Mark Billingham

This prequel to the Tom Thorne series takes us back to 1996 and the disappearance of a young child. A nostalgic look back at 1990s Britain and a great read from one of the best crime writers around.

 

The Weekend Away by Sarah Alderson

When two friends go on holiday to Lisbon, only one returns. Just what did happen to Kate and what secrets has she been hiding? A great summer read with one of the best last pages I’ve read in a long time.

 

 

The Resident by David Jackson

A serial killer trying to evade the police chances upon an empty house with access to the attic space of several other houses providing him with the perfect cover for the games he has planned… A chilling yet humorous read, deserving of the social media hype! Review to follow. 

 

Before He Kills Again by Margaret Murphy

A predator stalks the streets of Liverpool, attacking women and subjecting them to indescribable terrors. Detective Cassie Rowan has made the case personal and now he has his sights set on her. Review to follow.

 

Books I Have Acquired

PS: Thanks for the murders.

The death of a ninety-year-old woman with a heart condition should absolutely not be suspicious. DS Harbinder Kaur certainly sees nothing to concern her in carer Natalka’s account of Peggy Smith’s death.

But when Natalka reveals that Peggy lied about her heart condition and that she had been sure someone was following her…

And that Peggy Smith had been a ‘murder consultant’ who plotted deaths for authors, and knew more about murder than anyone has any right to…

And when clearing out Peggy’s flat ends in Natalka being held at gunpoint by a masked figure…

Well then DS Harbinder Kaur thinks that maybe there is no such thing as an unsuspicious death after all.

 

A victim? Or a killer?

One icy cold morning, the remains of a woman are discovered. She has been abused, then butchered. DI Kelly Porter knows this is the work of a monster. One who has killed before – and will do so again.

Kevin Flint is a young man with no friends and a reputation for being odd. He explores the hidden corners of the Lake District, and likes to creep, and watch. He witnesses depravity and it excites him. But will he cross the line from bystander to perpetrator?

Despite her personal life taking unexpected turns, Kelly’s detective instincts tell her that the answers lie with Kevin – if only she knew the right questions to ask. Will Kelly miss her chance and have blood on her hands? And will she ever be the same when it’s over?

 

When Kate Marshall finds the bloated body of a young man floating in the Shadow Sands reservoir, the authorities label it a tragic accident.

But the details don’t add up: why was the victim there, in the middle of the night? If he was such a strong swimmer, how did he drown?

Kate is certain there is more to this case than meets the eye. As she and her research assistant Tristan Harper dig deeper, they discover a bloody trail that points towards an active serial killer hiding in plain sight. People have been silently disappearing for years, and when another woman is taken, Kate and Tristan have a matter of days to save her from meeting the same fate.

 

In a peaceful retirement village, four unlikely friends meet up once a week to investigate unsolved murders.

But when a brutal killing takes place on their very doorstep, the Thursday Murder Club find themselves in the middle of their first live case.

Elizabeth, Joyce, Ibrahim and Ron might be pushing eighty but they still have a few tricks up their sleeves.

Can our unorthodox but brilliant gang catch the killer before it’s too late?

 

What happened while they were sleeping?

A school for the deaf takes an overnight trip to the snowy woods. Five teenagers go to sleep, but only four wake up. Leon is missing, and a teacher’s body is found in the forest…

Sign language interpreter Paige Northwood is brought in to help with interrogations. Everyone at the school has a motive for murder – but they all have an alibi.  

As Paige becomes increasingly involved, she suspects there’s something sinister going on. With the clock ticking to find Leon, only one thing is certain: the killer is among them, and ready to strike again…

 

Detective Megan Thomas hoped that moving to Devon would mean a quiet life. Her years undercover in London left her broken and alone, unsure if she would ever recover. Slowly, she’s learning to work with a team and trust other people. But when her sister Debbie finds the body of local businessman Greg Porter, that peace is shattered.

Porter’s wife and children don’t seem entirely grief-stricken, and his business dealings are not all they appear to be. So why are the police so determined to focus on Debbie? And why is she acting so suspiciously? When Megan learns what happened between Porter and Debbie, it threatens to tear the family apart, and forces her to ask if her beloved sister could really have done something so terrible.

Her boss won’t allow her anywhere near the case, leaving Megan on the sidelines. Caught between the job she loves, and what she feels she must do, Megan finds herself faced with an impossible decision. She’s desperate to save her sister, but what if Debbie is lying? When a second body and a surprise confession takes the case into even muddier waters, Megan must decide where her loyalty lies – with her family, or the truth.

And whatever choice she makes, will she be able to live with herself?

Are there any of these books that you have read or are looking forward to reading? 

 

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