Search

Go Buy The Book

Tag

Mr Whicher

A Very British Murder by Lucy Worsley

18042000For a long time, the British public has had an interest in murder, whether it be fictional or true crime. In A Very British Murder, Lucy Worsley looks at this interest in great detail, exploring cases such as the Ratcliff Highway and Road Hill Murders, before moving onto how crimes were reported and how they inspired detective fiction.

This is a book that has been on my TBR pile for a while and, as it’s been a while since I’ve read anything non-fiction, I decided it was time to give it a try. After watching the accompanying television series, I was looking forward to reading Lucy Worsley’s take on some of the cases I have enjoyed reading about over the years.

If you are looking for a straightforward compendium of British crime, then this is not the book for you. It does mention some of the more well-known crimes (I was particularly pleased to see the murder of Julia Wallace included, albeit fleetingly) but the emphasis is firmly placed on the public fascination for these events. I must admit, though, that these were the sections I enjoyed the most, even though I had read about most of the cases before!

Much of the book is devoted to the growth of the crime fiction genre from the likes of Wilkie Collins and Arthur Conan Doyle to the ‘golden age’ of detection with authors such as Agatha Christie and Dorothy L Sayers. There is even a modern slant where Worsley briefly discusses how these books and cases are being brought to life on television in the guise of Whitechapel, Ripper Street and The Suspicions of Mr Whicher. My only concern here is that the author gives out some major spoilers and there are certainly now some books that I no longer need to read!

Lucy Worsley’s writing style is very easy to follow and makes for an enjoyable read.

Scotland Yard’s First Cases by Joan Lock

51dify3x7glWhen you think of Victorian policing, the first thing that probably pops into your head is the hunt for Jack the Ripper. From a twenty-first century perspective, the methods undertaken by these officers seem primitive but, compared to when Scotland Yard’s first Detective branch was set up in 1842, they were actually quite organised.  In this book, Joan Lock discusses some of the more well-known cases investigated by the early Scotland Yard detectives along with many of the lesser-known ones.

As someone who is fascinated by Victorian crime, this book looked to be exactly the sort I would love to read, not least because the sub-heading, ‘A Window into the World of Mr. Whicher’, refers to the detective known for investigating the infamous Road Hill House murder. In the end, Whicher plays only a very small role in this book and the aforementioned case, the murder of Savile Kent, is only discussed briefly.

I found some of the cases more interesting to read about than others, although the main emphasis is not on the actual cases themselves but on the methods used to bring the culprits to justice. Joan Lock has certainly researched well in order to show how difficult it was for the police of their day in a job that was underpaid and where they had to face untold danger on a daily basis. It soon becomes apparent that a lot of cases were solved, not as a result of the forensic evidence that is used so much today, but due to the doggedness of the detectives and, often, by complete luck.

For anyone interested in the advent of the police force or Victorian crime in general, then this book is a must-read.

With thanks to Netgalley and Endeavour Press for the ARC.

 

 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑