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Monthly Round Up – May 2019

A bit of a mixed bag for me, this month, genre-wise with crime, biography and genealogical fiction all being read! I’ve also taken part in several blog tours, sharing reviews and extracts:

 

The Body in the Mist

The Family

Death and the Harlot

Death by Dark Waters

Foul Deeds Will Rise

A Walking Shadow

Books I Have Read

When Darkness Calls by Mark Griffin

The first in a new series and a debut book for the author, this has a great twisty serial killer plot with some genuinely tense moments. Holly Wakefield, criminal psychologist, is a great character. I look forward to seeing what comes next.

 

 

Night by Night by Jack Jordan

Another great book from Jack Jordan sees unreliable narrator, Rose, fixated with the disappearance of a man whose journal she has acquired. Dealing with some hard-hitting issues, this has a very thrilling showdown at the end!

 

Legacy of Guilt by Wendy Percival

This free short book, available on the author’s website, is a great introduction to her Esme Quentin series. If you’ve never read a genealogical mystery before, this is an excellent introduction.

 

A Date With Death by Mark Roberts

The fifth book in the Eve Clay series sees the detective investigating a serial killer who is targeting young women via a dating app. Another great book from Mark Roberts.

 

The Body in the Mist by Nick Louth

This is definitely a case of being thankful for your own family when we discover how dysfunctional DCI Craig Gillard’s is! A hit and run takes him to Exmoor where he is about to become embroiled in a very complicated case…

 

Bold Lies by Rachel Lynch

A complicated case for DI Kelly Porter sees her return to London and become reacquainted with a face from her past. My review for the fifth in the series will be published shortly as part of the blog tour.

 

What Nobody Knew by Amelia Hendrey

A heart-wrenching true story of a young girl’s life of abuse and neglect that had me angry throughout. My review will be part of the blog tour in a few weeks.

 

 

Salt Lane by William Shaw

A book I had been meaning to read for a while, it finally came off my TBR list and I’m glad it did. The first in the DS Alexandra Cupidi series sees the detective investigating the murder of a woman which soon becomes a much bigger case…

 

Books I Have Acquired

On a bitterly cold winter night, Kelly Ramage leaves her suburban home, telling her husband she’s going to meet a friend.

She never comes back.

When her body is discovered, murdered in what seems to be a sex game gone horribly wrong, Detectives Gino and Magozzi take the case, expecting to find a flirtatious trail leading straight to the killer.

However, Kelly’s sinister lover has done a disturbingly good job of hiding his identity. This isn’t his first victim – and that she won’t be the last…

 

Was Elizabeth I really the last Tudor princess…?

Nonsuch Palace, England, 1586

Elizabeth I has been queen for 28 years. She has survived hundreds of plots against her but now she faces the revelation of a secret she thought would remain hidden forever…

Elizabeth is not the last of the Tudor line — there are two more legitimate heirs to her crown.

Her sworn enemy, Philip II, King of Spain, has discovered the secret and thinks he can control the missing princess as his puppet queen.

Can Elizabeth maintain control over her throne? And what happened to the lost Tudor heirs?

Castle Jerusalem, Andorra, 2018

Dr Perdita Rivers and her twin sister Piper are safely hidden in Andorra.

Despite their narrow escape from those pursuing them, Perdita is determined to continue her grandmother’s legacy by uncovering her ground-breaking research into the English royal bloodline.

But she soon realises that nothing about the Tudor era was as it seemed. And now the national identity of Great Britain must be called into question.

With their enemies still tracking them and the lives of those they love in deadly risk, Perdita and Piper must succeed in exposing the secrets of history or there is no hope of them escaping alive…

 

D.C. Charlie Stafford is about to face her toughest case yet…

Someone is watching, waiting and preying on those who are at their weakest.

Uncover another gripping case in Sarah Flint’s latest action packed novel.

 

 

 

 

Happy reading!

 

 

A Date With Death by Mark Roberts

When the body of a woman is found on the banks of the River Mersey, scalped and her facial features removed, links are immediately made to a recent murder in nearby Warrington. When a third body is found, bearing the same injuries, DCI Eve Clay knows that there is a particularly sadistic serial killer operating on her patch. Each of the dead women had one major thing in common – they were all hoping to find love on the same dating website. Eve feels that there is only one way to stop ‘The Ghoul’ and that is to go undercover online, posing as his perfect victim…

I’m a huge fan of Mark Roberts and A Date With Death was one of the books I was most looking forward to reading this year. Ever since reading the first in the DCI Eve Clay books, Blood Mist, this series has become one of my firm favourites and Eve has become one of my favourite characters. This book, the fifth in the series, keeps up the high standard that I have come to expect.

One of the things I like most about this series is that we don’t have ordinary, run of the mill serial killers – if there is such a thing! In the past, we’ve had bodies arranged in patterns and a paedophile killer but now we have someone who slices off the faces of their victims. For those, of a squeamish nature, we don’t actually read about the act itself, but we do, towards the end of the book, find out the reason why the killer does this, making for a very gruesome scene!

Eve Clay is a great character with a gripping backstory, her traumatic past shaping how she is today. Although you do not need to have read the previous books in the series to enjoy this one, I have really enjoyed seeing how her character has developed. Even though she is dealing with a particularly horrific case, she appears to be becoming more able to separate her professional and personal life, not fretting as much about her young son as she has done in previous books.

Mark Roberts has definitely done it again with A Date With Death, writing a gripping book, impossible to put down. I’m already looking forward to the next one – maybe, in the meantime, I’ll bump into Clay’s husband and son at Goodison Park!

 

 

 

 

 

My Eagerly Anticipated Books of 2019

2019 looks like being another great year for books, in particular crime fiction. Here are the books that I am already looking forward to reading:

The Stone Circle by Elly Griffiths

Published 7th February 2019 by Quercus

DCI Nelson has been receiving threatening letters telling him to ‘go to the stone circle and rescue the innocent who is buried there’. He is shaken, not only because children are very much on his mind, with Michelle’s baby due to be born, but because although the letters are anonymous, they are somehow familiar. They read like the letters that first drew him into the case of The Crossing Places, and to Ruth. But the author of those letters is dead. Or are they?

Meanwhile Ruth is working on a dig in the Saltmarsh – another henge, known by the archaeologists as the stone circle – trying not to think about the baby. Then bones are found on the site, and identified as those of Margaret Lacey, a twelve-year-old girl who disappeared thirty years ago.

As the Margaret Lacey case progresses, more and more aspects of it begin to hark back to that first case of The Crossing Places, and to Scarlett Henderson, the girl Nelson couldn’t save. The past is reaching out for Ruth and Nelson, and its grip is deadly.

 

The Taking of Annie Thorne by C J Tudor

Published 21st February 2019 by Penguin

One night, Annie went missing. Disappeared from her own bed. There were searches, appeals. Everyone thought the worst. And then, miraculously, after forty-eight hours, she came back. But she couldn’t, or wouldn’t, say what had happened to her.

Something happened to my sister. I can’t explain what. I just know that when she came back, she wasn’t the same. She wasn’t my Annie.

I didn’t want to admit, even to myself, that sometimes I was scared to death of my own little sister.

 

Twisted by Steve Cavanagh

Published 24th January 2019 by Orion

BEFORE YOU READ THIS BOOK
I WANT YOU TO KNOW THREE THINGS:

1. The police are looking to charge me with murder.
2. No one knows who I am. Or how I did it.
3. If you think you’ve found me. I’m coming for you next.

After you’ve read this book, you’ll know: the truth is far more twisted…

 

 

A Date With Death by Mark Roberts

Published 2nd May 2019 by Head of Zeus

All they wanted was to find their happy-ever-after… Instead, they met their deaths.

Three women have been killed in Liverpool. The MO points to a stranger, and now DCI Eve Clay is on the trail of a vicious man who preys on lonely women on dating sites. He signs off the same way with each message: “Kiss kiss, night night.”

His crimes are escalating – and Eve has to stop him before another girl dies. But first she needs to find him. And that means going undercover online, and posing as his perfect victim…

 

Your Deepest Fear by David Jackson

Published 16th May 2019 by Zaffre

‘…They’re here. They’re-‘
The message on Sara Prior’s phone contains the last words she will ever hear from her husband. Racing to find him, she discovers he has been brutally murdered.
While the police struggle to uncover evidence around this shocking crime, it becomes clear that Sara is no ordinary bereaved wife. And she is not the sort of woman to let things lie. Following a hidden clue in her husband’s last desperate phone-call, Sara follows the trail to the house of the last person she’d expect . . .
Meanwhile DS Nathan Cody finds himself drawn into the darkest and most twisted case of his career. And this time things are about to get very very personal.

 

Dead Memories by Angela Marsons

Published 22nd February 2019 by Bookouture

She ruined their lives. Now they’re going to destroy hers.

‘Someone is recreating every traumatic point in your life. They are doing this to make you suffer, to make you hurt and the only possible end game can be death. Your death.’

On the fourth floor of Chaucer House, two teenagers are found chained to a radiator. The boy is dead but the girl is alive. For Detective Kim Stone every detail of the scene mirrors her own terrifying experience with her brother Mikey, when they lived in the same tower block thirty years ago.

When the bodies of a middle-aged couple are discovered in a burnt-out car, Kim can’t ignore the chilling similarity to the deaths of Erica and Keith – the only loving parents Kim had ever known.

Faced with a killer who is recreating traumatic events from her past, Kim must face the brutal truth that someone wants to hurt her in the worst way possible. Desperate to stay on the case, she is forced to work with profiler Alison Lowe who has been called in to observe and monitor Kim’s behaviour.

Kim has spent years catching dangerous criminals and protecting the innocent. But with a killer firmly fixed on destroying Kim, can she solve this complex case and save her own life or will she become the final victim?

 

The Five: The Untold Lives of the Women Killed by Jack the Ripper by Hallie Rubenhold

Published 28th February 2019 by Transworld Digital

Polly, Annie, Elizabeth, Catherine and Mary-Jane are famous for the same thing, though they never met. They came from Fleet Street, Knightsbridge, Wolverhampton, Sweden and Wales. They wrote ballads, ran coffee houses, lived on country estates, they breathed ink-dust from printing presses and escaped people-traffickers.
What they had in common was the year of their murders: 1888. The person responsible was never identified, but the character created by the press to fill that gap has become far more famous than any of these five women.

For more than a century, newspapers have been keen to tell us that ‘the Ripper’ preyed on prostitutes. Not only is this untrue, as historian Hallie Rubenhold has discovered, it has prevented the real stories of these fascinating women from being told. Now, in this devastating narrative of five lives, Rubenhold finally sets the record straight, revealing a world not just of Dickens and Queen Victoria, but of poverty, homelessness and rampant misogyny. They died because they were in the wrong place at the wrong time – but their greatest misfortune was to be born a woman.

 

Just some of the books I’m looking forward to reading although, as always, I’ll be hoping for a new Tennison book from Lynda La Plante, and books from Luca Veste, Steve Robinson and Nathan Dylan Goodwin amongst others. Are any of these on your list or are there others I should be looking out for? I’d love to hear what you think!

My Books of 2018

As another year draws to a close, it’s time to, once again, look back at what I’ve read over the past twelve months and try to narrow it down to my ten favourites. Not an easy job! Again, I’ve looked back through my Goodreads reviews to see which books I gave five stars to and have chosen from there. Here are my final ten, in no particular order:

 

Don’t Make a Sound by David Jackson

Although I’ve said that my list is in no particular order, this is by far my favourite book of the year. I loved the first two books in the Nathan Cody series but Don’t Make a Sound really is something else. Telling the story of the loathsome Malcolm Benson and the young children he has abducted, this book really did make me gasp in shock as I neared the end. There are not many books that throw me completely off the scent, but David Jackson’s twist succeeded to the point where I had to go back and re-read several pages to ensure that I had read it correctly! I predicted in January that this would be one of my favourite books of the year and I was right!

 

 

Dying Truth by Angela Marsons

The eighth in the Kim Stone series and one that had many devoted fans reaching for their tissues! The investigation into the deaths of some of the pupils at a local school saw Angela Marsons taking the story arc somewhere we never expected it to go. This is a series that is showing no signs of slowing down and Dying Truth is definitely up there as one of the best. If you have never read an Angela Marsons book, you don’t know what you’re missing!

 

The Stranger Diaries by Elly Griffiths

I’m a huge fan of her Ruth Galloway and Stephens & Mephisto books, so I couldn’t wait to read Elly’s standalone, The Stranger Diaries. Part murder-mystery, part gothic thriller, when the body of her friend is found with horrific injuries, English teacher Clare is immediately a suspect. Clare, an expert in the author R M Holland, is perturbed when a quote from one of his stories is found nearby. This is soon followed by strange comments in her personal diary. Is someone messing with her mind or is there really a supernatural link to the case? A superb read.

 

Her Last Move by John Marrs

A gruesome murder-mystery that is more of a ‘whydunit’ than a ‘whodunit’. The two main protagonists, Joe and Becca, are investigating a serial killer who is stalking the streets of London, remaining one step ahead of the police at all times. This book has stuck in my mind mainly due to the twist that I most definitely did not see coming and is one that you don’t see very often in books of this genre.

 

Jar of Hearts by Jennifer Hillier

A twisty thriller that had me hooked from the very first page, Jar of Hearts tells the story of Geo, a woman who is about to be released from prison after serving time for her involvement in the murder of her high school friend. Her then boyfriend, Calvin, has escaped from prison and soon there is a trail of bodies all bearing the hallmarks of the Sweetbay Strangler. Is this a message for Geo and is she destined to be the next victim?

 

The Chalk Man by C. J. Tudor

This is a bit of a cheat really as I also included it in my books of 2017 but as it wasn’t officially published until 2018, I think I’m allowed to include it again! When a group of boys follow a trail of drawings depicting chalk men, they find a dismembered body in the woods, changing their lives forever. Now, thirty years later, the chalk men have started to reappear… Clever writing and an equally clever ending, I can’t wait to read the author’s next book, The Taking of Annie Thorne.

 

Killing Time by Mark Roberts

The fourth in the Eve Clay series is another dark thriller from Mark Roberts set, as in the previous books, in Liverpool, but also, this time, taking in the United States. When a young Czech girl is found abandoned in a park, there is some relief until the call comes in that two Polish men have been found dead in their burnt-out flat. Are the cases connected? There is, again, another chilling climax to the story with plenty of twists and turns along the way.

 

The Bone Keeper by Luca Veste

When a woman is found near a forest singing a childhood song about ‘the bone keeper’, people begin to ask the question – could the urban legend actually be real? A very eerie serial killer story with more than a touch of the macabre, Luca Veste has created another great protagonist in Louise Henderson (although I am still missing Murphy and Rossi!).

 

Move to Murder by Antony M Brown

The murder of Julia Wallace in 1931 is one of Britain’s classic unsolved cases. Move to Murder examines the evidence, putting forward several theories, asking the reader to take on the role of the jury and come up with a verdict. A well-written and researched book, this certainly made me question my long-held view on the case.

 

Thirteen by Steve Cavanagh

I’ve never been a fan of courtroom dramas, but the tagline, ‘The serial killer isn’t on trial. He’s on the jury’ was too intriguing to miss. With one of the worst (and ingenious) serial killers I’ve read about for a long time, this was definitely one of the books that lived up to the hype.

 

So, there you have it. There’s a few that just missed out, but I’m happy with my final ten. Have any of these made your list? Is there anything you think I should have included?

 

 

 

**BLOG TOUR** Killing Time by Mark Roberts

614hsAHOY-LI am really pleased to be the latest stop on the blog tour for the new DCI Eve Clay book by Mark Roberts, Killing Time.

When a young Czech girl is found abandoned in a Liverpool park, there is a huge sense of relief as this is the same child who has been missing for the past eight days. DCI Eve Clay is on her way to interview the clearly traumatised victim when she receives a call detailing another incident – two Polish men have been found dead in their burnt out flat. With the two cases occurring so close to each other, Clay begins to think that there may be a connection. When the chilling message, ‘killing time is here, embrace it’, is discovered at the flat, the police fear that there is much more to come.

Killing Time is the fourth book in the Eve Clay series and is one I’ve been looking forward to ever since reading the previous three. Although this is another dark tale of Liverpool’s underbelly, Mark Roberts has added a clever twist that sees the plot take in events in the United States. As in the previous books, being familiar with the setting added authenticity to the plot as I found myself picturing the places as I was reading.

From the start, it is hard to know which of the characters are exactly what they seem. The murdered men, Karl and Vaclav Adamczak, appear to the outside world to be hard-working and law-abiding. What, then, would make someone take their lives in such a vicious way and is there a connection to the abduction of the young Czech girl?

The Dare brothers, Raymond and Jack, however seem much more of an open and shut case. Raymond, a young man with mental health issues who is refusing to take his medication is clearly involved in petty crime. What we don’t know, though, is how far his criminal involvement has gone. His brother, Jack, a reformed criminal, is now involved with the church and his attempts to help his brother are proving futile. Jack clearly has something to hide but is it what we think? As the cases begin to merge, what Eve Clay and her detectives discover, is a story much bigger than they ever could have imagined.

I love the character of Eve Clay, a detective determined to right the world’s wrongs. Her back story is an absolutely fascinating one and I enjoy reading about her time, as a young child, in the children’s home. Her feisty character was evident from an early age and her Everton references made this Evertonian laugh out loud! I felt that Eve seemed much more relaxed than in previous books with regards to her son, and it was nice to see this side of her.

Killing Time is a very dark thriller full of twists and turns that kept me engrossed right until the end. One of the things I love most about Mark Roberts’ books is the atmospheric settings he chooses for the chilling climax to the story. Without going into too much detail for fear of giving away spoilers, the venue chosen for the closing of Killing Time is an iconic Liverpool location that fits in well with the tone of the book.

I thoroughly enjoyed Killing Time and hope it won’t be too long before the next installment.

With thanks to Aria/Head of Zeus and Net Galley for my ARC.

Take a look at the rest of the blogs on the tour:

Previous books in the Eve Clay series:

Blood Mist

Dead Silent

Day of the Dead

 

 

 

Monthly Roundup: March 2018

In a month where I thought reading time would be limited, managing to get chicken pox has certainly given me a bit more time on my hands! Thankfully, just before I became ill, I managed to attend the launch night for the new book by Luca Veste, ‘The Bone Keeper’, meeting the man himself and also the other fantastic author David Jackson. A link to my review of ‘The Bone Keeper’ can be found below and you can also see my review of Don’t Make a Sound here, the outstanding new book from David Jackson. Published on May 3 2018, this is one of my favourite books of the years so far!

Books I Have Read

No Safe Place Patricia GibneyNo Safe Place by Patricia Gibney

When women begin to go missing on the Dublin-Ragmullin train, Detective Lottie Parker fears that a serial killer is at work. After the body of one of the girls is discovered in an open grave, she knows that they have a race against time to find the women before they become the next victims. The fourth book in the Lottie Parker series is another great read.

 

Member of the Family: Manson, Murder and Me by Dianne Lake

Everyone knows something about the infamous killings orchestrated by Charles Manson. Where this book differs is that it is told from the perspective of someone who was actually part of the Family. Dianne’s story is one of how a need to belong forced her into being part of one of the world’s most infamous cults at the tender age of fourteen. A fascinating read.

 

Trafficked Girl by Zoe Patterson

A highly emotive real-life story of how society failed a young girl, abused from an early age by her mother and then bullied, ignored and trafficked as a result of her time in ‘care’. It’s not often a book makes me completely despair of the society we live in but this one managed to do just that. A well-written book.

 

Mind of a Killer by Simon Beaufort

People are being murdered in Victorian London, parts of their brain removed. Even though they have been officially told to stay away, journalists Lonsdale and Friederichs put themselves into untold danger by trying to uncover exactly what is happening.

 

The Bone Keeper by Luca Veste

Every town has an urban legend, but what if that urban legend turned out to be true? When numerous bodies are found, attributed to the legendary Bone Keeper, Detective Louise Henderson must investigate the myth whilst coming to terms with events from her own past. A chilling read!

 

614hsAHOY-LKilling Time by Mark Roberts

When a young Czech girl is found abandoned in a park after being missing for eight days and two Polish men are found dead in their burnt flat, DCI Eve Clay fears that there is something sinister afoot in Liverpool. Is there a connection between the crimes and does the graffiti found at the victims’ home mean that more deaths are to follow? Another great read from Mark Roberts. (Full review to follow)

 

61lypFhIrtLDeadly Secrets by Robert Bryndza

The sixth in the Erika Foster series sees the detective investigating the murder of a young burlesque dancer and the assaults of numerous people by a gas mask-wearing assailant. All of this series have been excellent, but this one is probably my favourite so far!

 

51b9NbGiGzLPerfect Match by D. B. Thorne

D. B. Thorne again looks at the dangers of the internet when a young woman is found brutally assaulted after going on an online date. Knowing that this is not an isolated incident, her brother Solomon is rebuffed by the police so embarks on his own dangerous investigation.

 

The Vanished Child by M J Lee

The fourth in the Jayne Sinclair series sees the genealogist on the trail of a child born out of wedlock during the Second World War. A highly emotive story detailing one of the most controversial periods in recent history. A brilliant read and the best one of the series so far.

 

Books I Have Acquired

4128bR3P03LPolly, 28, lives in London with her ‘perfect-on-paper’ boyfriend. She works a dead end job on a free London paper… life as she knows it is dull. But her banal existence is turned upside down late one drunken night on her way home, after a chance encounter with a man on a packed tube train. The chemistry between them is electric and on impulse, they kiss, giving in to their carnal desires. But it’s over in an instant, and Polly is left shell-shocked as he walks away without even telling her his name.

Now obsessed with this beautiful stranger, Polly begins a frantic online search, and finally discovers more about tubing , an underground phenomenon in which total strangers set up illicit, silent, sexual meetings on busy commuter tube trains. In the process, she manages to track him down and he slowly lures her into his murky world, setting up encounters with different men via Twitter.

At first she thinks she can keep it separate from the rest of her life, but things soon spiral out of control.

By chance she spots him on a packed tube train with a young, pretty blonde. Seething with jealousy, she watches them together. But something isn’t right and a horrific turn of events make Polly realise not only how foolish she has been, but how much danger she is in…

 

51zNl-mP6eL

You can always trust your best friend… can’t you?

When Rachel discovers a Twitter message arranging a romantic liaison she assumes her husband is having an affair, and follows him. What she witnesses is so much worse: a hit and run using his car.

Meanwhile, Rachel’s friend and business partner Suzie is increasingly worried about her fiance, who’s not been in touch for days. When Suzie learns of huge debts racked up in her name she fears he has run out on her, but then the threatening calls start and she thinks something terrible has happened.

Rachel and Suzie are both about to learn shocking things about the men they love, worse than they could ever imagine… Can their friendship survive?

Can she get out before it s too late?

 

Just before Christmas 1908, Marion Gilchrist, a wealthy 82-year-old spinster, was found bludgeoned to death in her Glasgow home. A valuable diamond brooch was missing, and police soon fastened on a suspect – Oscar Slater, a Jewish immigrant who was rumoured to have a disreputable character. Slater had an alibi, but was nonetheless convicted and sentenced to death, later commuted to life imprisonment in the notorious Peterhead Prison.

Seventeen years later, a convict called William Gordon was released from Peterhead. Concealed in a false tooth was a message, addressed to the only man Slater thought could help him – Arthur Conan Doyle. Always a champion of the downtrodden, Conan Doyle turned his formidable talents to freeing Slater, deploying a forensic mind worthy of Sherlock Holmes.

Drawing from original sources including Oscar Slater’s prison letters, this is Margalit Fox’s vivid and compelling account of one of the greatest miscarriages of justice in Scottish history.

 

I was thrilled to see that there is a new Angela Marsons ‘Kim Stone’ book imminent – definitely one to watch out for!

 

 

My Books of 2017

2017 has been another great year for books, both from returning authors and debut writers. In an attempt to try to choose my favourite ten, I looked back at my Goodreads ratings to look for all of my 5-star reviews. There were more than ten, so I’ve had to try to narrow it down even further! What follows are the books where the plot has stayed with me for one reason or another. In no particular order:

The Chalk Pit by Elly Griffiths

The Ruth Galloway series goes from strength to strength. This very topical book, dealing with the plight of the homeless, is extremely well-written and I can’t wait for the next book, The Dark Angel.

 

Hope to Die by David Jackson

A murder in the grounds of Liverpool’s Anglican Cathedral sees the start of a brutal killing spree by a killer filled with hate. The second in the Nathan Cody series saw us finding out a bit more about the detective’s past and the ending set up the next book nicely.

 

Love Like Blood by Mark Billingham

I’ve loved all of the Thorne books but this is definitely one where the plot will remain with me for a long time. A very emotive book dealing with the taboo subject of honour killings, as usual Mark Billingham’s writing is perfect.

 

 

My Sister’s Bones by Nuala Ellwood

A very clever book where you don’t know what to believe. Is there something sinister going on or is it all the imaginings of a highly-medicated war reporter? This was a slow burner that became high-octane towards the end of the book with plenty of shocks along the way.

 

The Perfect Victim by Corrie Jackson

I absolutely loved this book despite it being the second in a series where I had not read the first. An incredibly twisty plot that completely messed with my head yet was never once confusing. I’d love to see this one made into a film.

 

 

Dying Games by Steve Robinson

The books about genealogist Jefferson Tayte just keep getting better and better and this one, I feel, was one of the best. A lot more fast-paced than some of the others, we find Jefferson  racing against the clock to stop a serial killer in his tracks. Very reminiscent of Robert Langdon!

 

The Stolen Girls by Patricia Gibney

The second in the Lottie Parker series is a harrowing, emotional read which firmly placed the detective amongst my favourite characters. Death, prostitution, people trafficking and organ harvesting – this book has it all!

 

 

Day of the Dead by Mark Roberts

Another series set in Liverpool, but this time with a brilliant female protagonist, DCI Eve Clay. Some years ago, a paedophile-killer escaped from prison and now it seems as though he is back as the killings have started again. This series has a touch of the macabre about them and are a thrilling read!

 

The Good Mother by Karen Osman

A very character-driven novel about how destructive a secret can be. Told from the perspectives of three women, there was a definite ‘eureka’ moment which totally blew me away. Thrilling and emotive in equal measures.

 

 

The Chalk Man by C. J. Tudor

I toyed about putting this one in as it’s not actually published until January 2018 but it was so good that I had to! Set in the present day and in 1986, it is obvious that crimes have been committed in the past and a group of young friends are implicated in some way. This promises to be one of the books of 2018.

 

So there you have it! How many of these appear on your top ten?

Monthly Round Up: August 2017

August is always the month where I manage to read more books due to having time off work and this month I’ve managed to read a range of genres. I’m also pleased that I managed to finish another one from my Jo Nesbo tbr pile!

Books I’ve Read

51Ry-oprklLGirl A

The true story behind the Rochdale sex ring, as dramatised by the BBC in ‘Three Girls’ is shocking and heartbreaking read which leaves you with so many emotions.

 

517jii+ZhdLThe Silk Weaver’s Wife by Debbie Rix

Set both in the present day and the eighteenth century, The Silk Weaver’s Wife tells the story of two women unhappy with their lot and the ways in which their lives are changed. Vivid images of Italy in the 1700s are created bu the author’s wonderful description.

4631636995_252x379Death of a Cuckoo by Wendy Percival

A short story featuring the genealogist Esme Quentin, full of mystery and intrigue as a recently-bereaved woman tries to uncover the real story behind her background.

 

51h+jCAxF8LDead Silent by Mark Roberts

The second in the DCI Eve Clay books sees the detective trying to find a particularly gruesome murderer who is staging scenes from disturbing paintings. A fast-paced, exciting read.

 

71sRUnuQnbLGood Friday by Lynda La Plante

The third of the Prime Suspect prequels sees Jane Tennison, now a fully-fledged detective, fearing for her life as she witnesses an IRA bomb at Covent Garden underground station.

 

Nemesis by Jo Nesbo

Nemesis, the fourth of Jo Nesbo’s Harry Hole series sees Harry investigating a fatal bank raid whilst also trying to prove himself innocent of a crime he didn’t commit.

 

Did You See Melody? by Sophie Hannah

When Cara travels from England to the US for some time away from her problems, she doesn’t ever imagine that she is going to become embroiled in one of the biggest murder cases that America has ever seen. An enjoyable read.

 

Find Me by J S Monroe

Jar has never really come to terms with the suicide of his girlfriend five years ago so when he is convinced that he’s seen her in a train station, it sets off a chain of events that threatens to rock his world completely. My review will be published on September 12th as part of the blog tour.

 

Books I’ve Acquired

Nothing Stays Buried is the eighth book in P.J. Tracy’s addictive and internationally bestselling Monkeewrench series

There’s a search for a missing girl, and another for a serial killer: death holds all the cards . . .

When Marla Gustafson vanishes on her way to her father’s farm, her car left empty on the side of an isolated country road, even Grace MacBride and her eccentric team of analysts are baffled.

Meanwhile in Minneapolis, homicide detectives Gino and Magozzi have a serial killer on their hands – two women murdered in cruelly similar fashion, with playing cards left on the bodies. But one card is an ace, the other is a four – it seems the killer is already two murders ahead.

With both teams stumped, it slowly becomes clear the evidence is inexplicably entangled. And they have little time to unravel the threads: a twisted killer is intent on playing out the deck…

 

She fell in love with a killer, now she’s one too.

The suitcase was badly rusted, and took Erika several attempts, but it yielded and sagged open as she unzipped it. Nothing could prepare her for what she would find inside…

When a battered suitcase containing the dismembered body of a young man washes up on the shore of the river Thames, Detective Erika Foster is shocked. She’s worked on some terrifying cases but never seen anything like this before.

As Erika and her team set to work, she makes the link with another victim – the body of a young woman dumped in an identical suitcase two weeks ago.

Erika quickly realises she’s on the trail of a serial killer who’s already made their next move. Yet just as Erika starts to make headway with the investigation, she is the victim of a brutal attack.

But nothing will stop Erika. As the body count rises, the twin daughters of her colleague Commander Marsh are abducted, and the stakes are higher than ever before. Can Erika save the lives of two innocent children before it’s too late? She’s running out of time and about to make a disturbing discovery…there’s more than one killer.

 

In her most dangerous case yet, Jayne Sinclair investigates the family background of a potential candidate to be President of the United States of America.

When the politician who commissioned the genealogical research is shot dead in front of her, Jayne is forced to flee for her life. Why was he killed? And who is trying to stop the American Candidate’s family past from being revealed?

Jayne Sinclair is caught in a deadly race against time to discover the truth, armed only with her own wits and ability to research secrets hidden in the past.

 

I can’t wait to read the Robert Bryndza book and see what it has in store for Erika! It’s also now only a matter of weeks before Dan Brown’s new book, ‘Origin’ hits the shelves – I’m so pleased that he’s, once again, decided to set this one in Europe.

Happy reading!

 

Dead Silent by Mark Roberts

51h+jCAxF8LProfessor of medieval art, Leonard Lawson, has been mutilated and murdered, the attack witnessed by his traumatized daughter, Louise. To add to the horror, DCI Eve Clay must try to discover the significance of his body being arranged into a parody of the art work he has spent his life studying. Despite the professor having no known enemies, Clay knows that this attack was personal and is desperate to find the culprit before they find another victim to exact revenge upon.

I was first introduced to the books of Mark Roberts earlier this year after looking for reads set in my home city and thoroughly enjoyed the first book in the Eve Clay series, Blood Mist. Having fully intended to read the series in order, I was given the opportunity to participate in the blog tour for the superb Day of the Dead, meaning that I have actually read the books out of sequence, Dead Silent being the second of the three. This was not a problem, however, as it not completely essential to have read them in order.

If you have read any of the Eve Clay books, you will already know that there is a touch of the macabre about them and this is indeed evident in Dead Silent. The descriptions of the crime scenes were particularly graphic and not for the faint-hearted. It is easy to imagine these novels on the small screen and some of the scenes in this book were reminiscent of the BBC series, Messiah, starring Ken Stott.

In Eve Clay, we have a very likeable, if troubled protagonist. In Dead Silent, we get to find out a bit more about her childhood in the children’s home, helping to explain why she is so dedicated to her job yet neurotic about the safety of her family. It is also good to see a police department where everyone seems to get on well and is just as devoted to solving the case as Clay.

What I enjoyed most about this book is that Mark Roberts drip-feeds you information throughout, allowing you time to try to fathom out what is taking place. Just when you think you have it all worked out, though, he throws a complete curve-ball and makes you reconsider everything you thought. This made Dead Silent a genuinely enjoyable read, and one which makes you think about how important and formative the early lives of children are.

A fantastic read and I can’t wait for the next installment!

 

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