Search

Go Buy The Book

Tag

journalism

**BLOG TOUR** The Quiet Ones by Theresa Talbot

Usually when a celebrity dies, their peers rush to the media to profess their sadness for the loss of a good friend. So why isn’t this the case when Scottish football coach, Harry Nugent, is found brutally murdered? Investigative journalist Oonagh O’Neil believes that there is a story here, something in Nugent’s past that has been well-hidden. What she discovers is a cover-up of immense proportions that threatens to put her own life in danger.

After reading and enjoying the previous book in this series, Keep Her Silent, I was pleased to be given the opportunity to be one of the blogs on the tour for The Quiet Ones. If this series is new to you, it can be read as a standalone, so please don’t be put off by the fact that you haven’t read the first two.

The third book in the Oonagh O’Neil series sees Theresa Talbot tackling another topical and emotive subject, namely the abuse of young boys at the grassroots level of football. One of the things I admire about Theresa Talbot is that she is not afraid to shy away from controversial topics, telling the stories of the victims in a sensitive yet informative way. The chapters set in 1983 that were interspersed throughout the story were particularly hard hitting as we read about the abuse of a hopeful young footballer and how it affected his whole life. I felt increasingly angry as the book progressed, about how these people were able to hide in plain sight and continue their crimes undetected.

Just when I thought I knew where this book was going to go, Oonagh’s investigations opened up another line of enquiry, one that the police had not yet discovered. I admired how, even though she was going through some turmoil in her own life, her doggedness helped to expose the truth behind the death of Harry Nugent. There were definitely shades of Jimmy Savile here, with a cover-up involving numerous people, and it was, at times, unsettling to read.

The Quiet Ones is a superb read and one where the plot will remain with you for quite some time.

With thanks to Aria Fiction and Net Galley for my ARC and to Vicky Joss for organising the blog tour.

Buy links:

Amazon: https://amzn.to/2Tqo8Ns

Kobo: https://bit.ly/2Z0KtCq

iBooks: https://apple.co/2Mdbzod

Google Play: https://bit.ly/33y0Aez

 

 

Then She Vanishes by Claire Douglas

Many years ago, in the quiet town of Tilby, teenager Flora Powell went out, never to be seen again. Now, her sister, Heather, has committed an unthinkable crime, her own life hanging in the balance. Journalist Jess, tasked with writing about the event, has more reasons than most to uncover the truth – she used to be Heather’s best friend and was there the day Flora disappeared. Jess knows she must face her past and return to where it all began. Just what exactly happened to Flora and how is it linked to current events?

This is one of those books that gets you hooked from the first chapter as we witness the fatal shooting of a man and his elderly mother by a calm, cold-blooded killer. From the outset, we are introduced to the main mysteries in the book: Who is the killer? Who are the victims? What links them? As the book progresses, it soon becomes apparent that there are more secrets in the Powell family and that the disappearance of Flora seems to be, somehow, linked to the killings. The story alternates between the present day investigation and the run-up to Flora’s disappearance, twenty years ago, providing us with a fast-paced, gripping plot that just makes you not want to put the book down!

I liked the character of Jess who we see battling with her emotions, feeling the pressure from her boss to exploit her relationship with the family to secure exclusive interviews with the family. This was particularly difficult for her as we discover the reason for her leaving her previous post was due to the much-publicised phone hacking scandal, so she could really do with keeping her work above board. For much of the book, I did not know how I felt about Heather, but I think that this is the author’s intention: she is a multi-faceted character who, to understand her fully, you will need to read the whole book.

Although there are some parts of the mystery that do not come as a surprise, there are quite a few red herrings along the way which make you change your theory as you are reading. There are enough shifty characters to make you question which of them were involved in Flora’s disappearance, each with their own motive. The revelation of what exactly happened to Flora is a particularly shocking one, and one that filled me with hatred for those responsible.

I have really enjoyed reading Claire Douglas’s books before – take a look at my reviews of Last Seen Alive and Local Girl Missing – and this one is another fantastic read. If you’re looking for a thriller that will grab and hold your attention, one of those ‘just one more chapter’ books, then Then She Vanishes is the book for you! Highly recommended!

With thanks to Penguin UK – Michael Joseph and Netgalley for my copy.

Mind of a Killer by Simon Beaufort

51mHX+TCFHLPall Mall Gazette reporter Alec Lonsdale is working on a fatal house fire when he is accosted by a woman telling him that there have been more deaths and she has information on them. After a post-mortem reveals that the victim, Patrick Donovan, was murdered and that part of his brain had been removed, Lonsdale is determined to put his journalistic skills to good use and investigate what has happened. Assisted by his colleague, the feisty female reporter, Hulda Friederichs, when more bodies are found, their attempts to uncover the truth are thwarted at every step. Exactly who is stopping them from uncovering the truth?

One of the things I enjoy most about well-written historical crime fiction is the ability to transport the reader back in time, giving you the opportunity to experience the sounds, sights and smells of the era. Mind of a Killer certainly does this, evoking images of downtrodden Londoners, doing anything they can to make ends meet. In stark contrast, we see how life differed for the upper classes, and how vast the divide between the two groups was. Simon Beaufort certainly takes you back to Victorian London to a time when people were distrustful of the new underground rail system  and how journalists were reluctant to print celebrity stories!

By having journalists as the main protagonists, Mind of a Killer moves the story away from it being a typical police procedural. Lonsdale is a great character but he is usurped in every scene by the inimitable Hulda, a strong woman if ever there was one! I was fascinated to read that the character was based on a real journalist who worked for The Pall Mall Gazette. Obviously, the author has taken some artistic licence, but after reading that she was the first female journalist to work on the same   pay terms as her male counterparts, there is certainly an element of the fictional firebrand there!

The mystery is a particularly gruesome one with people being found murdered, horrifically disfigured with their cerebrum removed. It soon becomes apparent that there is more than one killer on the loose and that there are several other conspirators bound to keeping the operation secret. Despite the nature of the crimes, the actual murders are mainly kept off the page meaning that it never becomes too much to read for anyone of a nervous disposition.

Mind of a Killer is a great read which will hopefully become part of a series. Lonsdale and Friederichs definitely have more to offer.

With thanks to Severn House Publishers and Net Galley for the ARC.

**BLOG TOUR** The Perfect Victim by Corrie Jackson

41cxnbhoYTLWhen a young woman is found drowned in a river, and her colleague, Charlie Swift, is suspected of murder, journalist Sophie Kent must reassess everything she thought she knew about her friend. Convinced of his innocence, even after he disappears, Sophie soon finds that all was not well in Charlie’s seemingly perfect marriage to his second wife, Emily. As the plot unravels, Sophie does not know who she can trust and soon her own life is in danger…

I liked Sophie, the main protagonist, and felt that her being a journalist rather than a traditional police investigator brought something different to the table. From the outset, we get to see her ‘journalist’s nose’ at work as she arrives on the scene of a drowning and immediately seeks out information to confirm foul play. When it becomes apparent that there is a connection between the dead woman and her friend and colleague, Charlie Swift, we see a different side of Sophie as she wrestles with her conscience – can she really believe that one of the people she trusts most could be involved in this most heinous of crimes?

Corrie Jackson

In parts, The Perfect Victim is very reminiscent of Gillian Flynn’s Gone Girl in that there is a lot of subterfuge and misdirection. Where Corrie Jackson differs, however, is that she had the ability to make me change my mind every few pages as to what was actually happening! Every time I felt I had the plot worked out, she hit me with a new revelation that made me rethink my theory once again! This is a book with an enormous amount of twists and turns but I never once felt as though I didn’t have a handle on the story, which is something that can happen in a plot such as this.

When I started to read The Perfect Victim, I was not aware that this was the second novel in a series where I had not read the first. This can sometimes be problematic if there is a plot running through the books but I am pleased to say that not reading the previous one did not hinder me in the slightest although I now regret not doing so! What a book! I even found myself going on a couple of lengthy bus journeys to give me some extra reading time!

The Perfect Victim is a very clever book and is one that I can easily see being transferred to the big screen. It is complex yet is so skilfully-written that it never once feels confusing. Definitely one of my favourite books of 2017 and one that I would highly recommend!

With thanks to Net Galley and Bonnier Zaffre for my ARC and also to Emily Burns for inviting me to be part of the blog tour.

Take a look at the rest of the blogs featuring on the blog tour:

 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑