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J S Monroe

**Blog Tour** The Man on Hackpen Hill by J S Monroe

Crop circles often appear in Wiltshire but this one on Hackpen Hill is a bit different: the patterns seem to be trying to convey a message and the dead body in the middle is certainly not a common feature. DI Silas Hart is at a loss until he happens upon Jim, a Porton Down scientist who is convinced he is being pursued by MI5 for wanting to tell the truth about what is happening at the government laboratory. With Bella, a trainee journalist intent on telling Jim’s story, someone is desperate to stop the truth being told and is prepared to kill to achieve their aim.

This is an intense read that grabs you right from the very beginning and keeps you hooked until the last page. There is a lot going on with elements of mystery, thriller and police procedural but the short pacy chapters keep you gripped, making you want to read ‘just one more’ before putting it down. It is really well-researched and I do not claim to understand all of the science, but this did not hamper my understanding or enjoyment of the plot in any way.

There are two sets of main characters, each with a distinctive role in the plot. In Jim and Bella, we have like-minded people who have been thrown together by an unknown person, each of them reliant upon the other. I genuinely feared for Jim’s safety throughout the book as it becomes apparent that he seems to have information on what message the crop circles are trying to convey. Likewise, as Bella became more and more embroiled in Jim’s world, her well-being became more of a concern, especially as other aspects of her life start to become more worrying. I admired the courage of Jim and Bella; Jim in particular was a favourite character.

I loved the relationship between the two main police characters and enjoyed how the focus was very much on their part in the investigation and not on their private lives. I feel that there is scope for DI Hart and DC Strover to appear in another book so I hope it’s not the last we see of them.

I thoroughly enjoyed the intelligent plot of The Man on Hackpen Hill and found myself drawn into the plot, desperate to see if my theories were correct! A great read.

With thanks to Lauren Tavella from Head of Zeus for my copy.


Monthly Round Up – August 2021

August brought a range of books for me and I acquired some of the books I’ve been looking forward to reading.

Books I Have Read

The Chain by Adrian McKinty

When a young girl is abducted, it sets a chain of events in motion. To get her back, her mum must pay a ransom and find a replacement child. A great premise for a novel with some shocking moments.




The Devil’s Advocate by Steve Cavanagh

The latest in the Eddie Flynn series deals with corrupt law enforcement and racism amongst other controversial topics. This is a series that just gets better and better!


Brass Lives by Chris Nickson

The year is 1913 and Leeds detective Tom Harper is back investigating a string of crimes unlike anything he has ever seen before. Guns and American gangsters along with trauma in his personal life make this a very testing case for Tom.


The Man on Hackpen Hill by J S Monroe

This multi-genre book had me gripped from beginning to end. A man is found dead in the middle of a crop circle with a coded message that Porton Down scientist, Jim, seems to understand. What is the meaning behind the death and why is Jim fearing for his life? My review will form part of the forthcoming blog tour.


Put a Paper Towel on It by Lee & Adam Parkinson

A very funny and accurate portrayal of life in a primary school. From the staffroom, school trips, lessons and not forgetting the children, this is a must-read for all teachers and parents. Review to follow.

Books I Have Acquired

It’s the following Thursday.

Elizabeth has received a letter from an old colleague, a man with whom she has a long history. He’s made a big mistake, and he needs her help. His story involves stolen diamonds, a violent mobster, and a very real threat to his life.

As bodies start piling up, Elizabeth enlists Joyce, Ibrahim and Ron in the hunt for a ruthless murderer. And if they find the diamonds too? Well, wouldn’t that be a bonus?

But this time they are up against an enemy who wouldn’t bat an eyelid at knocking off four septuagenarians. Can The Thursday Murder Club find the killer (and the diamonds) before the killer finds them?


A MISSING CHILD

Ten years ago, the disappearance of firearms police officer Jonah Colley’s young son almost destroyed him.

A GRUESOME DISCOVERY

A plea for help from an old friend leads Jonah to Slaughter Quay, and the discovery of four bodies. Brutally attacked and left for dead, he is the only survivor.

A SEARCH FOR THE TRUTH

Under suspicion himself, he uncovers a network of secrets and lies about the people he thought he knew – forcing him to question what really happened all those years ago…


Three severed hands. No clues. A race against time.

Three embalmed hands are discovered in a disused Victorian house. Is it a gangland ritual? The work of a cult? Or just a prank played by Medical Students? And what happened to the bodies?

Meanwhile the Coroner needs to issue a Presumption of Death certificate on a teenage girl who vanished eleven years ago in mysterious circumstances.

As hints emerge the two cases are connected, DI Ridpath pushes himself to the limit to find out what really happened. It soon emerges the house is a former children’s home. When another woman, a local social worker, disappears, he is under immense pressure to find answers. What really happened at Daisy House Children’s Home all those years ago?

He has just one week to discover the truth…


When the danger is already inside, nowhere is safe…

Highton prison sits nestled within the moors of western Cumbria, close to the coastal road. When two former inmates turn up dead, DI Kelly Porter is tasked with finding out why. It soon becomes obvious that she is hunting for one killer and the place where both victims were incarcerated holds the key. As Kelly delves into life at Highton she finds more questions than answers. A web of corruption and deceit emerges within the prison walls.

As Kelly gets closer to unpicking the relationships between the officers and their wards, a full scale prison riot explodes – with police caught in the middle. Kelly now faces a hostage situation with a well-loved member of her team caught in the middle.



In a town full of secrets…
Someone was murdered.
Someone went to prison.
And everyone’s a suspect.
Can you uncover the truth?

Dear Reader – enclosed are all the documents you need to solve a case. It starts with the arrival of two mysterious newcomers to the small town of Lockwood, and ends with a tragic death.

Someone has already been convicted of this brutal murder and is currently in prison, but we suspect they are innocent. What’s more, we believe far darker secrets have yet to be revealed.

Throughout the Fairway Players’ staging of All My Sons and the charity appeal for little Poppy Reswick’s life-saving medical treatment, the murderer hid in plain sight. Yet we believe they gave themselves away. In writing. The evidence is all here, between the lines, waiting to be discovered.

Will you accept the challenge? Can you uncover the truth?



So there you have it! Have you read any of these yet?

Monthly Round Up – June 2019

We are now into the second half of the year and I am on schedule to meet my Goodreads target although my Net Galley books just don’t seem to be going down – a problem I’m sure many of you share!

Books I’ve Read

The Ghost of Hollow House by Linda Stratmann

The latest in the Mina Scarletti series sees the Victorian author / ghost debunker investigating the ghostly goings-on at the ancient Hollow House. With secrets lurking around every corner, just what will Mina manage to uncover?

Forget My Name by J S Monroe

When a woman turns up unannounced at a house, claiming to live there, the occupants have no idea who she is. With no memory of who she is, it soon becomes clear that there is something strange going on but who is she and what is her connection to the house? A great psychological thriller.

The Sinclair Betrayal by M J Lee

When genealogist Jayne Sinclair decides to bite the bullet and investigate her own family history, little does she know what she is about to uncover. Murder, espionage and Wartime Europe all help to create a thrilling book which is my favourite of the series so far.

The Elizabeth Tudor Conspiracy by Alexandra Walsh

The second in the Marquess House dual timeline series takes us back to the reign of Elizabeth I. With more revelations which could threaten British History as we know it, Perdita and Piper Rivers must tread carefully if they are to protect their own lives.

Then She Vanishes by Claire Douglas

Twenty years ago, teenager Flora Powell disappeared. Now, her sister, Heather, stands accused of the bloody murder of a man and his elderly mother. Are the events somehow linked and what actually happened to Flora? This is full of twists and turns – a superb read!

Books I’ve Acquired

Nothing has felt right since she told the lie… 

Claire Carmichael leads a charmed life. She has two beautiful sons, Jamie and Joshua, and a handsome and successful husband who loves her. She has been taught well by her mother – the most important thing Claire has is her good reputation. 

He said, she said… 

Even when she was in school, Claire had it all. She was clever, likable, and after passing the initiation tests, she was welcomed into the society of popular girls – The Queen Bees. So when a scandal threatened to ruin Claire’s reputation, the Queen Bees closed rank to protect her, no matter who else got hurt. 

Never forgotten, never forgiven… 

Claire may have moved on from her school days, but for one person who she hurt irreparably, those memories are as fresh as blood. And all it takes to reap their revenge, is ONE PERFECT LIE.

If only someone had listened… 

When the supposed suicide of famous Scottish football coach Harry Nugent hits the headlines, the tabloids are filled with tributes to a charitable pillar of the community that gave so much back to sport and to those less fortunate. 

But something isn’t right. Normally celebrities are queuing up to claim to have had a very special relationship with the deceased, but investigative journalist Oonagh O’Neil is getting the distinct impression that people are trying to distance themselves from Harry. 

Oonagh’s investigation leads her to uncover a heartbreakingly haunting cover-up that chills her to the core… and places her in mortal danger from those willing to protect their sadistic and dark secrets at any cost…

Finally we’re playing a game. A game that I have chosen. I give one last push of the roundabout and stand back. ‘You really should have played with me,’ I tell her again although I know she can no longer hear.

Late one summer evening, Detective Kim Stone arrives at Haden Hill Park to the scene of a horrific crime: a woman in her sixties tied to a swing with barbed wire and an X carved into the back of her neck. 

The victim, Belinda Evans, was a retired college Professor of Child Psychology. As Kim and her team search her home, they find an overnight bag packed and begin to unravel a complex relationship between Belinda and her sister Veronica.

Then two more bodies are found bearing the same distinctive markings, and Kim knows she is on the hunt for a ritualistic serial killer. Linking the victims, Kim discovers they were involved in annual tournaments for gifted children and were on their way to the next event. 

With DS Penn immersed in the murder case of a young man, Kim and her team are already stretched and up against one of the most ruthless killers they’ve ever encountered. The clues lie in investigating every child who attended the tournaments, dating back decades.

Faced with hundreds of potential leads and a bereaved sister who is refusing to talk, can Kim get inside the mind of a killer and stop another murder before it’s too late?

April 1980 and Jane is the first female detective to be posted to the Met’s renowned Flying Squad, commonly known as the ‘Sweeney’. Based at Rigg Approach in East London, they investigate armed robberies on banks, cash in transit and other business premises. 

Jane thinks her transfer is on merit and is surprised to discover she is actually part of a short term internal experiment, intended to have a calming influence on a team that likes to dub themselves as the ‘Dirty Dozen’. 

The men on the squad don’t think a woman is up to the dangers they face when dealing with some of London’s most ruthless armed criminals, who think the only ‘good cop’ is a dead cop. Determined to prove she’s as good as the men, Jane discovers from a reliable witness that a gang is going to carry out a massive robbery involving millions of pounds. 

But she doesn’t know who they are, or where and when they will strike . . .

I can’t wait to read the next in the Jane Tennison and Kim Stone series! Happy reading!

**BLOG TOUR** Forget My Name by J S Monroe

Arriving at the airport to discover that her bag has been stolen, her passport, purse and key all gone, she tries to report it to the authorities but there is one huge problem – she can’t remember her name. The only thing that seems familiar is her home so that is where she heads, hoping that will help to trigger some more memories. Arriving at the door, however, she discovers a couple, Tony and Laura, living there and they have no recollection of her ever being there. Someone is lying, but who?

This is definitely one of those books where you cannot predict what is going to happen! Our lead character ‘Jemma’ is the ultimate unreliable narrator, her stress-related amnesia causing her to forget most of what has happened in her life with the exception of some rather important events. From the start, I didn’t know how I felt about her, unsure as to whether she was genuine or whether this was part of some elaborate scam. At the same time, I had great concern for her and hoped that she wasn’t allowing herself to become manipulated by another of the characters. My conflicting opinions of ‘Jemma’ continued throughout the book until we finally realise exactly what is happening. This kept me on the edge of my seat throughout, making it a very interesting reading journey.

From the outset, I had my concerns about Tony and Laura. If someone came to my house, claiming to live there, the last thing I would do would be to invite them to stay! It was obvious that there was something much bigger happening here, but what? Like ‘Jemma’, my opinions of Tony fluctuated throughout the book: was he genuine in his attempts to help her or was there something darker at play?

As I wrote earlier, it is impossible to predict what is going to happen in Forget My Name, although there were a few smaller points I did pick up on. There are a few red herrings thrown in along the way to help muddy the waters, meaning that I constantly found myself changing theories. I was shocked by what was revealed and immediately saw how clever one of the characters had been throughout the whole book.

Forget My Name is a clever book with a very novel plot, and one that I thoroughly enjoyed.

With thanks to Vicky Joss at Head of Zeus and Netgalley for my copy.

 

 

 

Monthly Round Up – March 2019

A quarter of the year gone and I am a couple of books ahead on my GoodReads challenge. At the moment, I’ve got so many good books to read from Net Galley and not enough time to read them!

Books I’ve Read

The Catherine Howard Conspiracy by Alexandra Walsh

The first in a dual timeline trilogy where we discover the re-imagined history of Henry VIII’s fifth wife, Catherine Howard. I love books where fact and fiction are blurred and this mystery definitely provided that! I can’t wait to read book two and pick up where we left off.

 

The Peacock Bottle by Angela Rigley

Another dual timeline story, this time both parts being set in different years of the Victorian era. When a young woman finds a hidden garden, she wonders what has happened in the past to put it into such a state. A gentle read, the review forming part of the blog tour.

 

Twisted by Steve Cavanagh

One of my favourite books of the year so far. Who is the mysterious J. T. LeBeau and what has he done? Definitely the sort of book where you should not read any spoilers in order to immerse yourself fully in the plot. Superb writing from Steve Cavanagh.

 

Family Ties by Nicholas Rhea

When Detective Mark Pemberton uncovers an unsolved case from 1916, he makes it his mission to find the murderer of Private James Hartley. Using the original notes and his own detective work, this is a police procedural with a twist.

 

Final Betrayal by Patricia Gibney

The sixth in the Lottie Parker series sees the detective investigating a serial killer who seems to be targeting pairs of young women. An action-packed plot and another great read. The review will form part of the blog tour in April.

 

Where the Dead Fall by M J Lee

I loved the first in the D I Ridpath series and this one is just as good. Still seconded to the coroner’s office, Ridpath witnesses a crime that threatens to reignite the gang wars in Manchester not seen since the 1990s. I couldn’t put this one down!

 

Books I’ve Acquired

‘Sara! Remember! Victoria and Albert. All I can say. They’re here. They’re-‘ 

These are the last words Sara Prior will ever hear from her husband.

As DS Nathan Cody struggles to make sense of the enigmatic message and solve the brutal murder, it soon becomes clear that Sara is no ordinary bereaved wife. Taking the investigation into her own hands, Sara is drawn into a world of violence that will lead her in a direction she would never have suspected.

For Cody, meanwhile, things are about to get personal in the darkest and most twisted ways imaginable .

 

You are outside your front door. There are strangers in your house. Then you realise… You can’t remember your name.

She arrived at the train station after a difficult week at work. Her bag had been stolen, and with it, her identity. Her whole life was in there – passport, wallet, house key. When she tried to report the theft, she couldn’t remember her own name. All she knew was her own address.

Now she’s outside Tony and Laura’s front door. She says she lives in their home. They say they have never met her before.

One of them is lying.

 

 

The charred remains of a child are discovered – a child no one seems to have missed…

It’s high summer, and the lakes are in the midst of an unrelenting heatwave. Uncontrollable fell fires are breaking out across the moors faster than they can be extinguished. When firefighters uncover the body of a dead child at the heart of the latest blaze, Detective Chief Inspector Jude Satterthwaite’s arson investigation turns to one of murder.

Jude was born and bred in the Lake District. He knows everyone… and everyone knows him. Except his intriguing new Detective Sergeant, Ashleigh O’Halloran, who is running from a dangerous past and has secrets of her own to hide…

Temperatures – and tension – in the village are rising, and with the body count rising Jude and his team race against the clock to catch the killer before it’s too late…

 

Leeds, England. July, 1899. The hot summer has been fairly quiet for Detective Superintendent Tom Harper and his squad, until a daring burglary occurs at an expensive Leeds address. Then his friend and former colleague, Inspector Billy Reed, asks for his help. Billy’s brother, Charlie, a shopkeeper, has committed suicide. Going through Charlie’s papers, Billy discovers crippling rent rises demanded by his new landlord. Could these have driven him to his death?

As Harper investigates, he uncovers a web of intimidation and corruption that leads back to the mysterious North Leeds Company. Who is pulling the strings behind the scenes and bringing a new kind of misery and violence to the people of Leeds? Harper is determined to unmask the culprits, but how much blood will be shed as he tries?

 

Polly, Annie, Elizabeth, Catherine and Mary-Jane are famous for the same thing, though they never met. They came from Fleet Street, Knightsbridge, Wolverhampton, Sweden and Wales. They wrote ballads, ran coffee houses, lived on country estates, they breathed ink-dust from printing presses and escaped people-traffickers.

What they had in common was the year of their murders: 1888.

Their murderer was never identified, but the name created for him by the press has become far more famous than any of these five women.

Now, in this devastating narrative of five lives, historian Hallie Rubenhold finally sets the record straight, and gives these women back their stories.

Five devastating human stories and a dark and moving portrait of Victorian London – the untold lives of the women killed by Jack the Ripper.

 

I’ve just started reading The Five, a book I’ve been looking forward to reading ever since hearing about it last year. I’ve heard nothing but good things about this one! Happy reading!

 

 

 

 

 

Monthly Roundup – December 2018

Another year is over and I’m happy to report that I managed to complete my Goodreads reading challenge! I’d set myself a target of 60 books but read 75, so I’m quite pleased with that!

I’ve read a range of different books this month and have taken part in a few blog tours. One of the blog tours was for We All Fall Down by Cynthia Clarke where I was pleased to be able to share an extract, and what an extract it was! I was also one of the blogs to feature on the tour for the latest book by J. S. Monroe, Forget My Name. I also shared an extract from Picking Up The Pieces by Jo Worgan as part of the huge Urbane Extravaganza, organised by Love Books Group Tours.

Books I’ve Read

61dkqcjG65LThe Mile End Murder by Sinclair McKay

In 1860, a 70-year-old widow was bludgeoned to death at her London home. Although someone was convicted of the murder, it was widely accepted that a miscarriage of justice had taken place. Sinclair McKay examines the evidence and suggests an alternative theory as to what actually happened.

41yMiciSptL._SX323_BO1,204,203,200_Adrian Mole the Wilderness Years by Sue Townsend

I revisited this thanks to Radio Four’s Book at Bedtime and still found it funny the second time round. The eponymous diarist is now in his twenties and is still struggling with his family, work and love life. Not the best in the series, but still worth a read.

51xSXTTs1CLShe Was the Quiet One by Michele Campbell

A twisted tale of power and revenge, She Was the Quiet One tells the story of the murder of one of two sisters who have just enrolled at an exclusive boarding school. Who has been killed and who is the killer? I really enjoyed this book – a full review will be posted as part of the blog tour.

51ZvNY7p0KL._SY346_The Killing Habit by Mark Billingham

The fifteenth book in the Tom Thorne series sees the detective investigating a spate of cat killings in the London area. He soon deduces that cats are not the only living thing being killed but can he prevent even more deaths?

51bxBROykeLMove to Murder by Antony M Brown

A retelling of the murder of Julia Wallace which took place in Liverpool in 1931. The author puts forward five different theories that could potentially find the answer to the unsolved case. A well-written and researched book wit some very plausible theories.

518TmU9zu2LThe Slum Reaper by David Field

The fourth in David Field’s Jack & Esther Enright series sees them investigating what initially seems to be the accidental deaths of several people. As connections are made to a local slum clearance, however, they soon realise that the deaths are no accident – there is a killer on the loose in Victorian London.

The Murder of Patience Brooke by J C Briggs

After the murder of a woman on the steps of a home for ‘fallen women’, Charles Dickens and the London police force find themselves embroiled in a case which will see them exploring the darkest parts of the capital. A great, atmospheric first book in the series and I’m looking forward to reading the rest.

 

The Asylum by Nathan Dylan Goodwin

This short story is the prequel to the Morton Farrier series and tells us how the forensic genealogist came to meet Juliette,who he would go on to marry. Morton investigates the suspicious death of a woman who spent some time in an asylum in a case that proves to be both emotive and challenging.

 

Books I Have Acquired

Jenna thought she had the perfect life: a loving fiancé, a great job, a beautiful home. Then she finds her stepdaughter murdered; her partner missing.

And the police think she did it…

Locked up to await trial, surrounded by prisoners who’d hurt her if they knew what she’s accused of, certain someone close to her has framed her, Jenna knows what she needs to do:

Clear her name
Save her baby
Find the killer

But can she do it in time?

 

She vanished into the ice cold night. Is this their only chance to get her back? Get ready for this winter’s most chilling thriller…

It’s been eleven years since Claire Flynn disappeared – abducted without trace from a snowy hillside, leaving her parents heartbroken.

Investigator Darby McCormick remembers the case. She knows there’s only ever been one suspect, Father Richard Byrne, linked inconclusively to two similar disappearances.

Finally, terminally ill, Byrne is willing to talk. But he’ll only talk to Darby.

She’s expecting a confession – but what she hears is far more disturbing.

And it soon becomes clear that someone is willing to kill to keep this cold case on ice…

 

Wishing you all a happy new year!

 

**BLOG TOUR** Forget My Name by J. S. Monroe

Today, I am pleased to be the latest blog on the Forget My Name tour, the latest book by J. S. Monroe, whose previous book, Find Me, was definitely one of the most shocking reads of last year! It is my pleasure to be able to share an extract with you.

How do you know who to trust…

…when you don’t even know who you are?

You are outside your front door.

There are strangers in your house.

Then you realise. You can’t remember your name.

She arrived at the train station after a difficult week at work. Her bag had been stolen, and with it, her identity. Her whole life was in there – passport, wallet, house key. When she tried to report the theft, she couldn’t remember her own name. All she knew was her own address.

Now she’s outside Tony and Laura’s front door. She says she lives in their home. They say they have never met her before.

One of them is lying.

Tony positions himself in front of the door as I walk past him and up the stairs, my legs heavy with adrenaline. I try to picture the bedroom where I slept, remembering the layout of the house outside, which is single storey at the rear. There’s a sloping roof below the window, above the kitchen. Tiles and a central skylight.

I rush into the bedroom and look at my suitcase. There’s nothing I need in there and I have no intention of taking it with me. Instead, I grab my handwritten notes from the bedside table, skim read them again and fold them into the back pocket of my jeans. My hands are shaking. Tony is still at the bottom of the stairs. I walk across the landing and stand by the bathroom door.

‘Won’t be a minute,’ I call out.

I pull on the light cord and let it ping. Its handle is a carved wooden seahorse. I watch it whirl around for a second, feeling dizzy, and then I shut the bathroom door with its noisy farmhouse latch and tiptoe back to my room, closing the door behind me. The sash window opens more noisily than I expect and I slip one leg out onto the roof, desperate to get away.

‘What the hell are you doing?’

I spin round to see Tony standing in the bedroom doorway, arms folded. I stare at him and then turn back to the window. A robin on a tree in their back garden looks at me as if I’m the most stupid human on earth.

‘Running away isn’t going to help anyone,’ he says.

I don’t move. He’s right. I’ve made a mistake, thrown by the Jemma Huish development and the fact that she lived in this house. I just need to relax, trust the system.

‘I’m worried they’ll think I’m her,’ I say.

‘Listen, I dislike the cops more than most, but if you run now, you’re guilty. Period.’

I pull my leg in from the window and drop back into the bedroom, leaning against the window ledge. I’m embarrassed by my attempt to escape. It was the wrong move. Even the robin has flown off in disgust.

‘I’m sorry,’ I say. ‘I don’t know what I was thinking.’

‘It’s OK. We’ve all run away. It never helps.’

The room suddenly feels airless, intimate. As I pass him at the top of the stairs, he steps into my way and wraps his arms around me.

‘Here, let me give you a hug.’

I suppress my gut response to push him away and allow him to hold me. One, two, three seconds. And then I remove myself from his embrace. My breath shallowing, I follow him downstairs in silence and tell him I need the loo. After locking the door, I rest my forehead on the cold wall in front of me, close my eyes and try to think of the bodhi tree.

Forget My Name can be purchased here for only £2.48.

With thanks to Jade Gwilliam at Head of Zeus for organising the blog tour.

 

***BLOG TOUR*** Find Me by J S Monroe

I am pleased to be today’s stop on the Find Me blog tour.

Five years ago, Jar’s life changed forever when his girlfriend, Rosa, jumped to her death from a pier. Although Rosa had recently lost her father, her suicide was not exactly expected and Jar is finding it difficult to accept that she would take this action. Haunted by her memory, he sees her everywhere he goes, knowing full well that they are hallucinations. That is until he actually sees her – for real – in a train station. Then he receives an email: Find me, Jar. Find me, before they do…

Well, I can say with some certainty that this book was not what I expected! Recently, I read a book where the title character was wrongly presumed dead and I, naively, assumed this would be in a similar vein. It did start off in the way I expected with Jar refusing to give up hope despite a verdict of suicide being recorded. Of course, with no body being found, there was always a chance that Rosa would turn up somewhere and I don’t think it is too much of a spoiler when I say she does. What was particularly clever here, however, was this was not simply a plot where you spend the whole book awaiting the reunion as this happened fairly early on. This book is more about discovering the circumstances behind her disappearance and Jar’s determination to uncover the complete truth.

J. S. Monroe

Due to the shifts in time, Find Me is definitely a book where you have to concentrate otherwise it could become a tad confusing. It is also told from the perspective of several characters, mainly Jar, although we get to read Rosa’s diary and also a journal of an unnamed character who I shall refrain from naming so as not to give too much away! By using this style of writing, the author has ensured that all aspects of the story are covered and there are no unanswered questions.

It is not often that I am completely shocked by a book but I was totally taken aback when I found out exactly what had happened to Rosa. If you are a person of a nervous disposition, then this is where the book may become a bit uncomfortable as the descriptions of torture and those of animal cruelty are extremely graphic. This does make Find Me stand out from other books, however, and made it a gripping, unpredictable read. J S Monroe has managed to write a very clever, claustrophobic book where you genuinely don’t know who, apart from Jar, you can trust.

With thanks to Clare Gordon at Head of Zeus for my copy of Find Me.

Take a look at the rest of the tour:

 

About the Author

Jon Stock, now writing as J.S. Monroe, read English at Cambridge University, worked as a freelance journalist in London and was a regular contributor to BBC Radio 4. He was also a foreign correspondent in Delhi for the Daily Telegraph and was on its staff in London as Weekend editor. He left Telegraph in 2010 to finish writing his acclaimed Daniel Marchant spy trilogy and returned in 2013 to oversee the paper’s digital books channel. He became a full time author in 2015, writing as J.S. Monroe.
His first novel, ‘The Riot Act’ was shortlisted by the Crime Writers’ Association for its best first novel award. The film rights for ‘Dead Spy Running’, his third novel, were bought by Warner Bros, who hired Oscar-winner Stephen Gaghan (Traffic, Syriana) to write the screenplay. It is currently in development. He is the author of five novels and lives in Wiltshire, England, with his wife, a photographer, and their three children.

Monthly Round Up: August 2017

August is always the month where I manage to read more books due to having time off work and this month I’ve managed to read a range of genres. I’m also pleased that I managed to finish another one from my Jo Nesbo tbr pile!

Books I’ve Read

51Ry-oprklLGirl A

The true story behind the Rochdale sex ring, as dramatised by the BBC in ‘Three Girls’ is shocking and heartbreaking read which leaves you with so many emotions.

 

517jii+ZhdLThe Silk Weaver’s Wife by Debbie Rix

Set both in the present day and the eighteenth century, The Silk Weaver’s Wife tells the story of two women unhappy with their lot and the ways in which their lives are changed. Vivid images of Italy in the 1700s are created bu the author’s wonderful description.

4631636995_252x379Death of a Cuckoo by Wendy Percival

A short story featuring the genealogist Esme Quentin, full of mystery and intrigue as a recently-bereaved woman tries to uncover the real story behind her background.

 

51h+jCAxF8LDead Silent by Mark Roberts

The second in the DCI Eve Clay books sees the detective trying to find a particularly gruesome murderer who is staging scenes from disturbing paintings. A fast-paced, exciting read.

 

71sRUnuQnbLGood Friday by Lynda La Plante

The third of the Prime Suspect prequels sees Jane Tennison, now a fully-fledged detective, fearing for her life as she witnesses an IRA bomb at Covent Garden underground station.

 

Nemesis by Jo Nesbo

Nemesis, the fourth of Jo Nesbo’s Harry Hole series sees Harry investigating a fatal bank raid whilst also trying to prove himself innocent of a crime he didn’t commit.

 

Did You See Melody? by Sophie Hannah

When Cara travels from England to the US for some time away from her problems, she doesn’t ever imagine that she is going to become embroiled in one of the biggest murder cases that America has ever seen. An enjoyable read.

 

Find Me by J S Monroe

Jar has never really come to terms with the suicide of his girlfriend five years ago so when he is convinced that he’s seen her in a train station, it sets off a chain of events that threatens to rock his world completely. My review will be published on September 12th as part of the blog tour.

 

Books I’ve Acquired

Nothing Stays Buried is the eighth book in P.J. Tracy’s addictive and internationally bestselling Monkeewrench series

There’s a search for a missing girl, and another for a serial killer: death holds all the cards . . .

When Marla Gustafson vanishes on her way to her father’s farm, her car left empty on the side of an isolated country road, even Grace MacBride and her eccentric team of analysts are baffled.

Meanwhile in Minneapolis, homicide detectives Gino and Magozzi have a serial killer on their hands – two women murdered in cruelly similar fashion, with playing cards left on the bodies. But one card is an ace, the other is a four – it seems the killer is already two murders ahead.

With both teams stumped, it slowly becomes clear the evidence is inexplicably entangled. And they have little time to unravel the threads: a twisted killer is intent on playing out the deck…

 

She fell in love with a killer, now she’s one too.

The suitcase was badly rusted, and took Erika several attempts, but it yielded and sagged open as she unzipped it. Nothing could prepare her for what she would find inside…

When a battered suitcase containing the dismembered body of a young man washes up on the shore of the river Thames, Detective Erika Foster is shocked. She’s worked on some terrifying cases but never seen anything like this before.

As Erika and her team set to work, she makes the link with another victim – the body of a young woman dumped in an identical suitcase two weeks ago.

Erika quickly realises she’s on the trail of a serial killer who’s already made their next move. Yet just as Erika starts to make headway with the investigation, she is the victim of a brutal attack.

But nothing will stop Erika. As the body count rises, the twin daughters of her colleague Commander Marsh are abducted, and the stakes are higher than ever before. Can Erika save the lives of two innocent children before it’s too late? She’s running out of time and about to make a disturbing discovery…there’s more than one killer.

 

In her most dangerous case yet, Jayne Sinclair investigates the family background of a potential candidate to be President of the United States of America.

When the politician who commissioned the genealogical research is shot dead in front of her, Jayne is forced to flee for her life. Why was he killed? And who is trying to stop the American Candidate’s family past from being revealed?

Jayne Sinclair is caught in a deadly race against time to discover the truth, armed only with her own wits and ability to research secrets hidden in the past.

 

I can’t wait to read the Robert Bryndza book and see what it has in store for Erika! It’s also now only a matter of weeks before Dan Brown’s new book, ‘Origin’ hits the shelves – I’m so pleased that he’s, once again, decided to set this one in Europe.

Happy reading!

 

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