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Inside 10 Rillington Place

Monthly Round Up – January 2021

January is over and we’re still stuck in the middle of a pandemic. I’m finding it’s taking me quite a while to read books at the moment so I’ve been trying to focus on some of the books I am reading for blog tours. Luckily, they are all books that I’ve been looking forward to reading!

Books I Have Read

Inside 10 Rillington Place by Peter Thorley

I have always been interested in the Christie/Evans murders that took place at 10 Rillington Place and this book gives a great insight into what went on at this house of horrors. Written by the brother of Beryl Evans, one of the victims, I found this a fascinating recount of the events and one that certainly gave me food for thought.

Silent Voices by Patricia Gibney

The ninth book in the Lottie Parker series sees the detective taking on one of her most complex murder cases to date whilst also having to contend with her upcoming nuptials to her colleague, Boyd. My review will feature as part of the blog tour.

The Art of Death by David Fennell

It may only be January but I think that this may feature on my favourites list at the end of the year. An ‘artist’ is displaying his work in London, but this is no ordinary exhibition: the installations feature the bodies of dead people. My review will feature as part of the upcoming blog tour.


The Night Hawks by Elly Griffiths

Thirteen books in and this series is still one of my favourites! Forensic archaeologist Dr Ruth Galloway is back at the university but it’s not long before she is called upon by Nelson to help with the discovery of a body on the beach. Just what links the archaeologist group known as the Night Hawks to the death and is there really any truth in the local legend of the Black Shuck? Ruth Galloway at her best!


Hammer Blow by John Nixon

The latest in the Madeleine Porter series sees the genealogist taking on a case on behalf of a local solicitor, opening a can of worms when she reveals that a long-lost relative has left a client a sizable amount of money. With someone determined to avenge the past, can Madeleine help to close the case before they get their wish?


Books I Have Acquired

The sudden appearance of a man’s booted feet had Addis snapping her mouth shut. Screaming, she kicked out at the tall, muscular guy as he dragged her from beneath the desk…

It was a scene from a horror movie; Gabriel Kensington and his wife Lydia found, brutally slain in their luxurious home in New Mexico. The frantic, whispered phone call from their teenage daughter Addis, spending the evening with best friend Emerson, quickly alerts the authorities to the killings – and worse, that the killer is still inside the house.

But when detective Alyssa Wyatt and the squad appear at the house, the unthinkable has happened – the girls are nowhere to be found.

Waking up in a dilapidated cabin, nestled high in the woods north of Albuquerque, the girls find themselves at the mercy of a brutal stranger who could take their life at any moment. While they fight for survival, it’s up to Alyssa Wyatt and her partner Cord to discover just why the Kensingtons have been targeted – and fast.

Because for Addis and Emerson, solving this mystery might just mean the difference between survival – or an unthinkable death…


On a quiet street, one house is burning to the ground…

By the time sign language interpreter Paige Northwood arrives, flames have engulfed her client’s home. Though Lukas is safe, his wife is still inside. But she was dead before the fire started…

Lukas signs to Paige that he knows who killed his wife. But then he goes silent – even when the police arrest him on suspicion of murder.

Is he guilty, or afraid? Only Paige can help him now…




 A large country mansion. A locked room. A gruesome murder.

Russian oligarch Alexander Volkov has invited 1000 guests to a party at his palatial Surrey residence, Westgrave Hall. But while giving a private tour of the library, a gunman kills Volkov, wounding his ex-wife and slaying her new beau.

Nothing makes sense to DCI Craig Gillard. In the blood-spattered crime scene there are no forensic traces of anyone else involved, CCTV shows no one entered or left the library, and everyone seems to have an alibi.

Is it a crime of revenge, the squaring of a love triangle, or a Russian government operation? Could the victims have simply shot each other? Gillard’s eventual discovery is shocking even to him.


My current read is Alone in the Woods by Charly Cox. I’ve loved the previous two books in the series and this one is shaping up to be just as good!


Inside 10 Rillington Place by Peter Thorley

The events that occurred at 10 Rillington Place in the 1940s and 50s have become the subject of numerous books, documentaries, television serials and films. How much of this, however, paints an accurate picture of what actually happened? This is something that the author has tried to answer, using his first-hand experience of the house to discuss the real personalities of the two convicted killers that lived there: John Reginald Halliday Christie and Timothy Evans.

Before I give my opinion of the book, a little background information is needed for those unfamiliar with the case. In 1949, Timothy Evans was charged with the murder of his wife, Beryl, and his young daughter, Geraldine, whilst the family were living at 10 Rillington Place. Evans was, the following year, found guilty and was hanged at Pentonville Prison. In 1953, a horrific discovery occurred at the house when the bodies of several more women were found hidden in an alcove. Christie was subsequently arrested, he too being hanged at Pentonville. How probable was it that there were two unconnected murderers living at the house at the same time? With much of Evans’ prosecution evidence coming from Christie, there were questions asked about the fairness of his trial. Consequently, in 1966, Evans received a posthumous pardon for the murder of his daughter although it was still deemed likely that he had killed his wife.

I have read quite a lot about this case over the years, but this was the first time I’d read something from the perspective of someone so personally involved. The author, Peter Thorley, was Beryl’s younger brother and was someone who spent a bit of time at 10 Rillington Place visiting his sister and young niece. His insights into Beryl and Timothy’s life was fascinating, painting a picture of a truly unhappy marriage, with Beryl being the victim of her husband’s anger on practically a daily basis. I had great sympathy for Peter who, as her younger brother, felt powerless to help and angry that no one else in the family would listen to his fears.

Perhaps the biggest surprise to me was Peter’s attitude towards Christie. The young Peter certainly didn’t see a murderous side to him, and he actually felt that he liked children. Could this man, therefore, really have been responsible for the death of young Geraldine or were the original charges correct and Evans did actually kill his young daughter? The author definitely gives food for thought.

While this is a comprehensive account of the events at 10 Rillington Place, for me this was more about getting to know Beryl. In everything I have read and seen, there has never been a focus on the victim, something which Peter Thorley has put right here. My heart went out to Peter who found himself on the other side of the world when the murder happened, unable to be there for his beloved sister.

If you have an interest in true crime, I can thoroughly recommend this book. It is a well-written account of an infamous murder case with a personal slant which takes you right into the heart of 10 Rillington Place. I commend Peter Thorley for telling Beryl’s story.

With thanks to Net Galley and Mirror Books for my copy.

Monthly Round Up – August 2020

I thought I would have managed more books this month but I found that despite having more time to myself than in previous months, I didn’t actually read a great deal! I’ve got some great books to read in September, so I’m hoping to get through some of that TBR pile!

Books I’ve Read

Grave’s End by William Shaw

Murder and environmental activism combine in the third book in the DS Alexandra Cupidi series. A complex, very readable plot and the first time I’ve read chapters penned by a badger… It’s not as daft as it seems!

 

Lost Cause by Rachel Lynch

The eighth book in the Kelly Porter series has a particularly dark plot about the abduction and imprisonment of young women. This has become one of my favourite crime series, and this is one of the best so far.

 

The Thursday Murder Club by Richard Osman

A cosy mystery (albeit one with some gruesome murders) and a cast of unforgettable characters, this promises to be one of the hit novels of the year. A brilliant read.

 

Close to the Bone by Susan Wilkins

The second in the series to feature Megan Thomas sees the detective investigating the murder of a local businessman whilst also working alongside the NCA on a case involving human trafficking. This is promising to be a great series. Review to follow as part of the blog tour.

 

The Smuggler’s Daughter by Kerry Barrett

This dual timeline book set in present day Cornwall and the same place in 1799 is a wonderful mystery story about smuggling and revenge. Review to follow as part of the blog tour.

 

Books I’ve Acquired

The past is never over. It’s just waiting for an opportunity to return…

When the notorious serial killer the Beast of Manchester was captured, the streets should have been safe. Except the police got the wrong man. An innocent person was convicted, and only later was the culprit put away.

Now, those connected to the case are being targeted. Someone wants revenge. DI Thomas Ridpath has to relive the horrors all over again. As the bodies stack up once more, Ridpath knows the answers lie in the mistakes made the first time round.

But as he is searching for clues from years ago, fresh terror awaits. While Ridpath seeks to save lives, he risks overlooking the greatest danger of all – and losing more than he can stand.

 

‘He’s gone…’

When his daughter Samantha calls in the dead of night, John Rebus knows it’s not good news. Her husband has been missing for two days.

Rebus fears the worst – and knows from his lifetime in the police that his daughter will be the prime suspect.

He wasn’t the best father – the job always came first – but now his daughter needs him more than ever. But is he going as a father or a detective?

As he leaves at dawn to drive to the windswept coast – and a small town with big secrets – he wonders whether this might be the first time in his life where the truth is the one thing he doesn’t want to find…

 

10 Rillington Place: the house of death.

John Reginald Halliday Christie and Timothy John Evans were hanged after a series of brutal murders in the 1940s and 1950s.

But should they both have been executed?

The sole survivor who grew up with Christie and Evans tells the untold story of what really happened inside 10 Rillington Place…

 

 

 

He is my husband.
To honour and obey.
Until murder do us part.

London, 1888: Susannah rushes into marriage to a young and wealthy surgeon. After a passionate honeymoon, she returns home with her new husband wrapped around her little finger. But then everything changes. His behaviour becomes increasingly volatile and violent. He stays out all night, returning home bloodied and full of secrets.

Lonely and frustrated, Susannah starts following the gruesome reports of a spate of murders in Whitechapel. But as the killings continue, her mind takes her down the darkest path imaginable. Every time her husband stays out late, another victim is found dead.

Is it coincidence? Or is he the man they call Jack the Ripper?

 

Things can’t get much worse for detective Jane Tennison.

Unceremoniously kicked off the adrenaline-fuelled Flying Squad, she’s been relegated to Gerald Road, a small and sleepy police station in the heart of London’s affluent Knightsbridge.

With only petty crime to sink her teeth into, Tennison can feel her career slowly flatlining. That is until the discovery of the most brutal murder Jane has ever seen: Charlie Foxley has been found viciously beaten to death, his body dismembered and disembowelled.

As a big-time showbiz agent, Foxley had a lot of powerful friends – but even more enemies. And alongside her old friend DS Spencer Gibbs, Tennison must journey into the salacious world of show business to find the killer, before they strike again . . .

In Lynda La Plante’s most gripping thriller yet, Tennison discovers that the brightest lights hide the darkest secrets – and the killer doesn’t always hide in the shadows . . .

 

I’m currently reading, and enjoying, Blunt Force – I don’t think I’ve ever read a bad book by Lynda La Plante! Are any of these on your TBR list?

 

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