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Elly Griffiths

The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths

When 90-year-old Peggy Smith dies at home, her carer, Natalka, is not convinced that it is from natural causes and seeks out the advice of DS Harbinder Kaur. The detective’s interest is piqued when it is discovered that Peggy was a ‘murder consultant’, helping authors to plot the deaths of their characters, and that she was convinced that someone was watching her. When another death is reported and connections are made to Peggy, could Natalka be right? Is there a killer on the loose?

Last year, I read The Stranger Diaries by Elly Griffiths and one of the standout characters was the detective, Harbinder Kaur. I was thrilled, therefore, to see that she would be featured in a further novel, investigating another case of murder. If you have not read The Stranger Diaries, then don’t worry as this can be read as a standalone, giving you the opportunity to go back and read it after this one!

In The Postscript Murders, Elly Griffiths has created a superb array of supporting characters, each one bringing something different to the story. Even though her time in the book was short-lived, I thought Peggy was a great character and I enjoyed finding out more about her as her friends investigated her death. These friends were an odd combination of people and you may wonder how an elderly gentleman, a former monk who runs a coffee shop and a Ukrainian care worker come to work together to solve the murder! These unlikely sleuths make a great team, however, contributing brilliantly to the plot.

Although there are several deaths and plenty of intrigue, this is by no means a gory mystery, the book being laced with humour and numerous light-hearted and poignant moments. The Postscript Murders is a very enjoyable mystery story, easy to read and ideal for those long autumn nights. Fans of Elly Griffiths are going to love this and, hopefully, new fans will be introduced to this fantastic writer.

With thanks to Quercus and Net Galley for my copy of The Postscript Murders.

Take a look at my review of The Stranger Diaries.

 

 

Monthly Round Up – July 2020

This month, I’ve read a couple of books from my favourite authors and have been introduced to some new writers. I’d been pleased that I managed to get my Net Galley shelf down to just a few books but with some of the books I’ve been looking forward to appearing on there this month, I have succumbed once again! 

Books I Have Read

The Dead Tell Lies by J F Kirwan

Criminal psychologist Greg Adams specialises in hunting down serial killers but he has his work cut out with his present case. After the murder of his wife, he realises that her death has been attributed to the wrong man. Can he find the real killer before it is too late?

 

The Molten City by Chris Nickson

Leeds, 1908, and Detective Superintendent Tom Harper is awaiting a visit from the Prime Minister. With protests planned by several groups and the cold case investigation of a child who went missing fourteen years previously, the Leeds police department has a lot of work to do to prevent the collapse of law and order.

 

Hush Little Baby by Jane Isaac

Fifteen years ago, a baby went missing from outside a shop and was never seen again. Now,the body of a baby has been discovered, threatening to open up old wounds and revel secrets that have been well-hidden.

 

 

Cry Baby by Mark Billingham

This prequel to the Tom Thorne series takes us back to 1996 and the disappearance of a young child. A nostalgic look back at 1990s Britain and a great read from one of the best crime writers around.

 

The Weekend Away by Sarah Alderson

When two friends go on holiday to Lisbon, only one returns. Just what did happen to Kate and what secrets has she been hiding? A great summer read with one of the best last pages I’ve read in a long time.

 

 

The Resident by David Jackson

A serial killer trying to evade the police chances upon an empty house with access to the attic space of several other houses providing him with the perfect cover for the games he has planned… A chilling yet humorous read, deserving of the social media hype! Review to follow. 

 

Before He Kills Again by Margaret Murphy

A predator stalks the streets of Liverpool, attacking women and subjecting them to indescribable terrors. Detective Cassie Rowan has made the case personal and now he has his sights set on her. Review to follow.

 

Books I Have Acquired

PS: Thanks for the murders.

The death of a ninety-year-old woman with a heart condition should absolutely not be suspicious. DS Harbinder Kaur certainly sees nothing to concern her in carer Natalka’s account of Peggy Smith’s death.

But when Natalka reveals that Peggy lied about her heart condition and that she had been sure someone was following her…

And that Peggy Smith had been a ‘murder consultant’ who plotted deaths for authors, and knew more about murder than anyone has any right to…

And when clearing out Peggy’s flat ends in Natalka being held at gunpoint by a masked figure…

Well then DS Harbinder Kaur thinks that maybe there is no such thing as an unsuspicious death after all.

 

A victim? Or a killer?

One icy cold morning, the remains of a woman are discovered. She has been abused, then butchered. DI Kelly Porter knows this is the work of a monster. One who has killed before – and will do so again.

Kevin Flint is a young man with no friends and a reputation for being odd. He explores the hidden corners of the Lake District, and likes to creep, and watch. He witnesses depravity and it excites him. But will he cross the line from bystander to perpetrator?

Despite her personal life taking unexpected turns, Kelly’s detective instincts tell her that the answers lie with Kevin – if only she knew the right questions to ask. Will Kelly miss her chance and have blood on her hands? And will she ever be the same when it’s over?

 

When Kate Marshall finds the bloated body of a young man floating in the Shadow Sands reservoir, the authorities label it a tragic accident.

But the details don’t add up: why was the victim there, in the middle of the night? If he was such a strong swimmer, how did he drown?

Kate is certain there is more to this case than meets the eye. As she and her research assistant Tristan Harper dig deeper, they discover a bloody trail that points towards an active serial killer hiding in plain sight. People have been silently disappearing for years, and when another woman is taken, Kate and Tristan have a matter of days to save her from meeting the same fate.

 

In a peaceful retirement village, four unlikely friends meet up once a week to investigate unsolved murders.

But when a brutal killing takes place on their very doorstep, the Thursday Murder Club find themselves in the middle of their first live case.

Elizabeth, Joyce, Ibrahim and Ron might be pushing eighty but they still have a few tricks up their sleeves.

Can our unorthodox but brilliant gang catch the killer before it’s too late?

 

What happened while they were sleeping?

A school for the deaf takes an overnight trip to the snowy woods. Five teenagers go to sleep, but only four wake up. Leon is missing, and a teacher’s body is found in the forest…

Sign language interpreter Paige Northwood is brought in to help with interrogations. Everyone at the school has a motive for murder – but they all have an alibi.  

As Paige becomes increasingly involved, she suspects there’s something sinister going on. With the clock ticking to find Leon, only one thing is certain: the killer is among them, and ready to strike again…

 

Detective Megan Thomas hoped that moving to Devon would mean a quiet life. Her years undercover in London left her broken and alone, unsure if she would ever recover. Slowly, she’s learning to work with a team and trust other people. But when her sister Debbie finds the body of local businessman Greg Porter, that peace is shattered.

Porter’s wife and children don’t seem entirely grief-stricken, and his business dealings are not all they appear to be. So why are the police so determined to focus on Debbie? And why is she acting so suspiciously? When Megan learns what happened between Porter and Debbie, it threatens to tear the family apart, and forces her to ask if her beloved sister could really have done something so terrible.

Her boss won’t allow her anywhere near the case, leaving Megan on the sidelines. Caught between the job she loves, and what she feels she must do, Megan finds herself faced with an impossible decision. She’s desperate to save her sister, but what if Debbie is lying? When a second body and a surprise confession takes the case into even muddier waters, Megan must decide where her loyalty lies – with her family, or the truth.

And whatever choice she makes, will she be able to live with herself?

Are there any of these books that you have read or are looking forward to reading? 

 

A Girl Called Justice by Elly Griffiths

After the death of her mother, Justice Jones is packed off to Highbury House Boarding School for the Daughters of Gentlefolk. It doesn’t take the young sleuth long to realise that something strange is underfoot. Rumours circulate about the suspicious death of a former maid so when a teacher is also found dead, Justice embarks on a mission to solve the crimes. Putting her own life at risk in the process, will she manage to prevent further tragedies from occurring?

Elly Griffiths is one of my favourite authors and I am a huge fan of both her Ruth Galloway and Stephens & Mephisto series. Some time ago, I bought A Girl Called Justice as a prize for a girl in my class (she’s a fellow crime fiction fan!) and she has since declared it her favourite book and urged me to read it. After letting me borrow her copy, I can see why she enjoyed it so much!

Set in pre-war England, A Girl Called Justice took me right back to my childhood, with memories of Enid Blyton’s Malory Towers series mixed with her Five Find Outers books. Justice is a great character: despite the tragic reasons for her being at the boarding school, her tenacity shines through from the second she discovers that something is afoot at Highbury House. I liked how she didn’t really fit in with the rest of the girls, breaking the rules to befriend one of the maids instead, although I was pleased when she found a kindred spirit amongst the other girls in her dorm.

The mystery is well-paced with enough gruesomeness to keep children enthralled without ever being too scary. This is exactly the sort of book I would have loved when I was a child, and I am looking forward to reading the follow-up, The Smugglers’ Secret. My pupil has already told me that this is on her reading list!

 

Monthly Round Up – May 2020

I hope you are all well and keeping safe during these strange times. This month, all of my reads have been crime/mystery related although as well as fiction, I’ve read a non-fiction book and also one for younger readers – all brilliant!

Books I Have Read

Fifty Fifty by Steve Cavanagh

When two sisters both blame each other of murder and there is no way of determining which one actually did it, there is only one thing to do: put them both on trial. This is the fifth Eddie Flynn book in a series that is going from strength to strength.

 

Buried Angels by Patricia Gibney

This is the most complex plot to date for Patricia Gibney, in a story which sees Detective Lottie Parker investigating multiple murders spanning several decades. This is a series that I am still really enjoying.

 

The Glass House by Eve Chase

This captivating story of a dysfunctional family is one of my favourite reads of the year so far. A character-driven novel with death, mystery and intrigue makes this a perfect book to lose yourself in!

 

Poisoned at the Priory by Antony M Brown

This, the fourth book in the Cold Case Jury series, investigates the death of Victorian gentleman, Charles Bravo. Was it suicide or murder? If it was murder, who was the culprit? These are questions you must ask yourself as the evidence is presented to you. A great read for fans of true crime.

 

The Toybox by Charly Cox

This, the second in the Alyssa Wyatt series, is another great read after I thoroughly enjoyed the first one last year. A gripping tale of abduction and sex trafficking, this is a series not to be missed. My review will be published on June 6th as part of the blog tour.

 

A Girl Called Justice by Elly Griffiths

This may be a child’s book, but it’s a great mystery story from one of my favourite authors. When Justice Jones starts at a boarding school, she soon realises that strange things are happening. Just how did Mary the maid die and why are so many people creeping around at night? Another death confirms is – there is a killer on the loose. Review to follow.

 

Books I Have Acquired

The Kendrick family have been making world-famous dolls since the early 1800s. But their dolls aren’t coveted for the craftmanship alone. Each one has a specific emotion laid on it by its creator. A magic that can make you feel bucolic bliss or consuming paranoia at a single touch. Though founded by sisters, now only men may know the secrets of the workshop.

Persephone Kendrick longs to break tradition and learn the family craft, and when a handsome stranger arrives claiming doll-making talent and a blood tie to the Kendricks, she sees a chance to grasp all she desires.

But then, one night, the family’s most valuable doll is stolen. Only someone with knowledge of magic could have taken her. Only a Kendrick could have committed this crime…

 

DCI Jude Satterthwaite doesn’t get off to a great start with resentful Cody Wilder, who’s visiting Grasmere to present her latest research on Wordsworth. With some of the villagers unhappy about her visit, it’s up to DCI Satterthwaite to protect her – especially when her assistant is found hanging in the kitchen of their shared cottage.

With a constant flock of tourists and the local hippies welcoming in all who cross their paths, Jude’s home in the Lake District isn’t short of strangers. But with the ability to make enemies wherever she goes, the violence that follows in Cody’s wake leads DCI Satterthwaite’s investigation down the hidden paths of those he knows, and those he never knew even existed.

 

Would you forgive your child anything?

The murder of a young girl found barefoot in a country park and the re-emergence of shoes from the victims of a serial killer from over forty years ago. A coincidence or a connection?
Will Blake is determined to find out, but as he unearths the past, questions are raised about the original investigations and it becomes clear that The Wirral has a killer on the loose once again.

Victor Hunt, the father of the last dead girl from the original case, lies in a hospice with weeks to live. The truth lies hidden in Hunt’s tangled family tree, and the actions of his wayward daughter. Time is against Blake and his fractious team. If they don’t get to the root of past crimes, then innocent blood will flow again.

 

Derbyshire, England, 1603
Elizabeth I is dead and the Tudor reign is over. As the men in power decide to pass the throne to the Scottish King James, one woman debates changing the course of history.

Two Tudor heirs have been covered up for decades, and with a foreign king threatening the stability of England it could be time to bring the truth to the fore.

But there are reasons the Tudor children were put into hiding and exposing them would put not only their lives in danger, but the lives of many others as well…

Marquess House, Pembrokeshire, 2019

Dr Perdita Rivers and her sister Piper have returned to their ancestral home. But the ancient walls still contain riddles which the twins need to solve.

Perdita and Piper have already discovered earth-shattering secrets which will change the course of English history forever. But they are missing one vital piece of the puzzle.

Two Tudor rings have led them to cover-ups at the Tudor court, but now they must track down a missing silver locket to slot the final parts of the mystery together.

And just when it seems they could be ready to expose the centuries-old conspiracy, old enemies resurface to put their very lives at risk…

 

What happens on the pitch is only half the story.

Being a footballer is not just kicking a ball about with twenty-one other people on a big grass rectangle. Sometimes being a footballer is about accidentally becoming best mates with Mickey Rourke, or understanding why spitting is considered football’s most heinous crime.

In How to be a Footballer, Peter Crouch took us into a world of bad tattoos and even worse haircuts, a world where you’re on the pitch one minute, spending too much money on a personalised number plate the next. In I, Robot, he lifts the lid even further on the beautiful game. We will learn about Gareth Bale’s magic beans, the Golden Rhombus of Saturday night entertainment, and why Crouchy’s dad walks his dog wearing an England tracksuit from 2005.

‘Whether you’re an armchair expert, or out in the stands every Saturday, crazy for five-a-side or haven’t put on a pair of boots since school, this is the real inside story of how to be a footballer.’

 

A mixed bag of books to read! Do any of these look like something you’d enjoy?

 

Monthly Round Up – February 2020

The only up side to the numerous storms we’re currently enduring in Britain is that people are probably finding a bit more time to read! This month I’ve read a few cracking books.

 

Books I’ve Read

The Body in the Snow by Nick Louth

The fourth book in the DCI Craig Gillard series has a complex plot where you just can’t make up your mind who is the killer of celebrity cook, Tanvi Roy. This is a great police procedural series and is highly recommended.

 

The Lantern Men by Elly Griffiths

This is a series that just keeps getting better and better! The twelfth in the series sees Ruth Galloway assisting in the case of a convicted murderer – can she assist in finding the bodies of victims that haven’t yet been found? Elly Griffiths has written another superb book with plenty of heart-stopping moments.

 

The Sterling Affair by Nathan Dylan Goodwin

This is the most complex plot to date for Nathan Dylan Goodwin and sees forensic genealogist, Morton Farrier, investigating a particularly baffling case involving assumed identities. A superb read for those who enjoy genealogical mysteries. 

 

17 Church Row by James Carol

An unnerving look into the not-so-distant future sees a family moving into a state-of-the-art home, their lives being controlled by a souped-up version of Alexa! This is one of those books that really makes you think about the direction in which technology is going. 

 

The House on the Lake by Nuala Ellwood

When a woman flees an abusive relationship with her young son, she doesn’t expect to find herself in a dilapidated cottage in the middle of nowhere, a cottage with a very traumatic history. This is another fantastic read from Nuala Ellwood, an author whose books I always enjoy. 

 

The Prized Girl by Amy K Green

When a teenager is brutally murdered, there are no shortage of suspects, but are the police looking in the right place? Her older sister decides to take matters into her own hands, uncovering a wealth of family secrets in the process. A tense, thrilling read – my review will form part of the blog tour.

 

Little Doubt by Rachel Lynch

This topical tale of knife crime is my favourite in this series to date. Rachel Lynch has written a fast-paced, exciting read that I could definitely see on the small screen. Review to follow.

 

 

Books I’ve Acquired

Nowhere is safe. No one can be trusted.

A bloodied body is found in a Manchester Immigrant Removal Centre. The investigating officer and the pathologist seem certain: a suicide. But for DI Ridpath something doesn’t add up.

As the evidence starts to unravel, and with few leads, the pressure is on to find answers before the Inquest is closed. Caught between the police, the coroner and a system that doesn’t care, Ridpath isn’t making any friends.

And at the centre of the case Ridpath will find a heart of darkness. Innocent people are suffering. How many more will die before Ridpath discovers the truth?

 

Ursula, Gareth and Alice have never met before.

Ursula thinks she killed the love of her life.
Gareth’s been receiving strange postcards.
And Alice is being stalked.

None of them are used to relying on others – but when the three strangers’ lives unexpectedly collide, there’s only one thing for it: they have to stick together. Otherwise, one of them will die.
 
Three strangers, two secrets, one terrifying evening.

 

 

Megan has to climb round and step across the body to get a proper view. What’s left is like a chalk white mask in the rough shape of a face. The innocence is still there, and a hint of the cheekiness. But perhaps she is imagining that.

Detective Megan Thomas spent years undercover. It cost her marriage and her peace of mind, but she got the job done. Now she has to decide if she can go back to her life before, to a regular crime unit alongside other cops who have no idea about the fear that haunts her dreams. She’s still running from her memories. She doesn’t know how to stop.

Moving to Devon was meant to be a fresh start. She’s staying with her sister and swimming in the sea daily, battling the tides and letting the waves wash her past away. But she can’t outrun everything. First, the discovery of a body in a claustrophobic crime scene triggers a panic attack. And then, when she gets too emotionally involved in an attack on a local teenager, her boss pulls her off the case entirely.

When a body is found on the stretch of beach where she swims every day, Megan remembers why she joined the force, and what she’s fighting for… But how can she find justice for others, when she’s no longer sure of herself?

 

Some places make their own laws…

When Ella Watson, a woman of wealth and status, is brutally stabbed to death in broad daylight it sends a shockwave through the Lake District community. Later that day, Keira Bradley meets the same fate. But whereas Ella’s murder is a tragedy, Keira’s death on the notorious Beacon Estate is just another statistic in a dangerous place.

DI Kelly Porter has the unenviable job of running simultaneous investigations. Her efforts aren’t helped by a boss driven by protecting his reputation and a housing estate where fear rules and no one dare speak out. Kelly knows the answers can only be found by winning the trust of the residents at Beacon Estate. A task so hard it may be impossible.

Kelly puts everything she has into finding justice for both victims. The only thing she hadn’t anticipated was a traitor in the ranks. When the evidence points to someone in her team, Kelly has to put feelings aside and work the case – no matter where it leads. By the time it is over, nothing in her world will ever be the same…

 

Sometimes helping a stranger is the last thing you should do . . .

The Cornish village of St Petroc is the sort of place where people come to hide. Tom Killgannon is one such person. An ex-undercover cop, Tom is in the Witness Protection Programme hiding from some very violent people and St Petroc’s offers him a chance to live a safe and quiet life.

Until he meets Lila.

Lila is a seventeen-year-old runaway. When she breaks into Tom’s house she takes more than just his money. His wallet holds everything about his new identity. He also knows that Lila is in danger from the travellers’ commune she’s been living at. Something sinister has been going on there and Lila knows more than she realises.

But to find her he risks not only giving away his location to the gangs he’s in hiding from, but also becoming a target for whoever is hunting Lila.

 

Have you read any of these? I’d love to read your opinions!

 

 

The Lantern Men by Elly Griffiths

Dr Ruth Galloway has left behind her beloved Saltmarsh and is now teaching at St. Jude’s College, Cambridge, where she is now living with her daughter, Kate, and partner, Frank. Norfolk pulls her back, though, after convicted murderer Ivor March tells DCI Nelson that he will reveal the whereabouts of the bodies of two missing women, but only if Ruth can do the dig. Reluctantly, she agrees, conducting the dig in a place said to be haunted by the Lantern Men, figures who lure people to their deaths. As the case progresses, more questions begin to be asked: Why was March so insistent that Ruth be the one doing the digging and is, like Cathbad believes, March actually innocent of the crimes he has been convicted of?

It is fair to say that Elly Griffiths is one of my favourite authors and so The Lantern Men was one of the books on my most anticipated list for 2020. Ruth, Nelson, Cathbad and the rest of the characters in this wonderful series have become like old friends, and I could not wait to see what has happened to them since the previous book, The Stone Circle. Well, it’s safe to say that a lot has changed! Ruth has left her job, taking up a new appointment in Cambridge and living with her partner, Frank. We also find Clough working with another police force and Nelson enjoying being a father again, to his two-year-old son, George. It’s not long, though, before Elly Griffiths ‘gets the band together again’, as they investigate the deaths of the women.

Although Ivor March has been convicted of the murders of two of the women, doubt is soon cast as to his involvement when there is a new development. Ivor was definitely a charismatic, unnerving character, but was he a murderer? There were certainly plenty of people (mainly women) keen to see his conviction quashed, and Elly Griffiths has done a great job in introducing a smorgasbord of potential suspects, each one of them connected to March through his involvement with a local artistic commune. These characters were all suspicious in their own right, and I spent the book trying to figure out who, if any of them, were involved.

One of the things I enjoy most about this series is how archaeology and modern police forensics work hand in hand and this is certainly apparent is The Lantern Men. I love how archaeologist Ruth appears to be at her happiest when up to her knees in soil, yet worries about her appearance whenever Nelson is around! The relationship between these two characters is as complex as ever and with more and more people seemingly aware of their connection, this leads to some uncomfortable moments for them both.

I had no doubt that I would enjoy this book, but The Lantern Men managed to exceed my already high expectations. Heart-stopping in moments, this is an excellent addition to an already superb series. I look forward to seeing where Elly Griffiths takes Ruth next.

With thanks to Net Galley and Quercus for my copy.

Take a look at my reviews for the rest of this series:

The Crossing Places

The Janus Stone

The House at Sea’s End

A Room Full of Bones

Ruth’s First Christmas Tree

A Dying Fall

The Outcast Dead

The Ghost Fields

The Woman in Blue

The Chalk Pit

The Dark Angel

The Stone Circle

Monthly Round Up: January 2020

And so a new year begins! Thanks to Net Galley, I’ve been able to get hold of advance copies of some of the books I’ve been looking forward to, so February promises to contain some good books!

Books I’ve Read

The Penmaker’s Wife by Steve Robinson

A woman escapes her life in London, starting a new life in Victorian Birmingham with her young son. Despite managing to move up the social ladder, she soon realises that a past can never stay hidden, leading to some very disturbing circumstances.

 

The Stranger’s Wife by Anna Lou Weatherley

Two women, both in very different abusive relationships, each find a way to bring their suffering to an end. This is a great story featuring the very likeable detective Dan Riley.

 

The Other People by CJ Tudor

A man is informed that his wife and daughter have been killed, but how can this be when he’s just seen his daughter being driven down a motorway? His determination to find the truth leads him into a shadowy underworld and some very shady characters. I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

 

The Sinner by Martyn Waites

Ex-undercover police officer, Tom Killgannon, finds himself drawn back into his former role when he is asked to find the whereabouts of the undiscovered bodies of a convicted killer. The only problem is, this means him going inside the prison, posing as a prisoner, and soon he comes across a face from the past. This is a great thriller; my review will feature as part of the blog tour.

 

Why Mummy Doesn’t Give a ****! by Gill Sims

The third in the series sees Ellen dealing with a potential divorce, teenage children, a dog who isn’t exactly Instagrammable and chatty chickens who clearly dislike her! Some very funny scenarios which had me laughing out loud!

 

 

Books I’ve Acquired

Cold Case Jury presents its most confounding crime yet: Poisoned at the Priory.

1876. When the newlywed barrister Charles Bravo ingests a rare poison, all evidence suggests suicide. But in one of the most infamous inquests of all time, a coroner finds it to be an unlawful murder. So, we must ask, what is the truth?

The fourth book in Antony M. Brown’s popular Cold Case Jury series picks apart this notorious case that gripped Victorian Britain – and continues to spark debate to this day. Why did Bravo refuse any help, even when going through agonising pain? Was his wife, with her scandalous past, to blame? Or perhaps it was her former lover, eager to remove his usurper for good… or another sinister hand, moving silently?

In Poisoned at the Priory, Brown compiles the evidence and creates dramatic reconstructions of four main theories of how Charles Bravo may have died – including Agatha Christie’s solution, in her own words, for the very first time.

But was Christie correct? What’s your verdict in this spellbinding case?

 

If someone was in your house, you’d know … Wouldn’t you?

But the Hunter family are deaf, and don’t hear a thing when a shocking crime takes place in the middle of the night. Instead, they wake up to their worst nightmare: the murder of their daughter.

The police call Paige Northwood to the scene to interpret for the witnesses. They’re in shock, but Paige senses the Hunters are hiding something.

One by one, people from Paige’s community start to fall under suspicion. But who would kill a little girl?

Was it an intruder?

Or was the murderer closer to home?

 

DC Jack Warr and his girlfriend Maggie have just moved to London to start a new life together. Though charming, Jack can’t seem to find his place in the world – until he’s drawn into an investigation that turns his life upside down.

In the aftermath of a fire at an isolated cottage, a badly charred body is discovered, along with the burnt remains of millions of stolen, untraceable bank notes.

Jack’s search leads him deep into a murky criminal underworld – a world he finds himself surprisingly good at navigating. But as the line of the law becomes blurred, how far will Jack go to find the answers – and what will it cost him?

In BURIED, it’s time to meet DC Jack Warr as he digs up the deadly secrets of the past . . .

 

Everything has changed for Dr Ruth Galloway.

She has a new job, home and partner, and is no longer North Norfolk police’s resident forensic archaeologist. That is, until convicted murderer Ivor March offers to make DCI Nelson a deal. Nelson was always sure that March killed more women than he was charged with. Now March confirms this, and offers to show Nelson where the other bodies are buried – but only if Ruth will do the digging.

Curious, but wary, Ruth agrees. March tells Ruth that he killed four more women and that their bodies are buried near a village bordering the fens, said to be haunted by the Lantern Men, mysterious figures holding lights that lure travellers to their deaths.

Is Ivor March himself a lantern man, luring Ruth back to Norfolk? What is his plan, and why is she so crucial to it? And are the killings really over?

 

It was always going to end in trouble. But how did it end in murder?

A murdered beauty queen. A town full of secrets. Who killed Jenny?

Jenny Kennedy appears to have it all. She’s the perfect daughter, the popular girl at school and a successful beauty queen. But then Jenny is found dead in a murder that rocks the small town she grew up in to the core.

Her estranged half-sister Virginia finds herself thrust into the spotlight as the case dominates the news and is desperate to uncover who killed Jenny. But she soon realises that maybe Jenny’s life wasn’t so perfect after all.

The truth is that Jenny has more than a few secrets of her own, and so do her neighbours… What really happened that night?

 

I can’t wait to read the Lynda la Plante book – she’s been one of my favourite authors for some years. My next read is The Lantern Men by Elly Griffiths – I can’t wait to see what happens to Ruth Galloway next!

My Eagerly Anticipated Books of 2020

I’m pleased to say that the books I was most looking forward to in 2019 were all I hoped them to be. This year, as always, I will be hoping for new books from Patricia Gibney, Ian Rankin, Mark Billingham, Angela Marsons, Steve Robinson and David Jackson amongst others. Here are the books I am looking forward to in 2020 which already have publication dates:

The Lantern Men by Elly Griffiths

Published by Quercus on 6th February 2020

Everything has changed for Dr Ruth Galloway.

She has a new job, home and partner, and is no longer North Norfolk police’s resident forensic archaeologist. That is, until convicted murderer Ivor March offers to make DCI Nelson a deal. Nelson was always sure that March killed more women than he was charged with. Now March confirms this, and offers to show Nelson where the other bodies are buried – but only if Ruth will do the digging.

Curious, but wary, Ruth agrees. March tells Ruth that he killed four more women and that their bodies are buried near a village bordering the fens, said to be haunted by the Lantern Men, mysterious figures holding lights that lure travellers to their deaths.

Is Ivor March himself a lantern man, luring Ruth back to Norfolk? What is his plan, and why is she so crucial to it? And are the killings really over?

 

The Postscript Murders by Elly Griffiths

Published by Quercus on 1st October 2010

PS: Thanks for the murders.

The death of a ninety-year-old woman with a heart condition should absolutely not be suspicious. DS Harbinder Kaur certainly sees nothing to concern her in carer Natalka’s account of Peggy Smith’s death.

But when Natalka reveals that Peggy lied about her heart condition and that she had been sure someone was following her…
And that Peggy Smith had been a ‘murder consultant’ who plotted deaths for authors, and knew more about murder than anyone has any right to…
And when clearing out Peggy’s flat ends in Natalka being held at gunpoint by a masked figure…

Well then DS Harbinder Kaur thinks that maybe there is no such thing as an unsuspicious death after all.

 

Fifty Fifty by Steve Cavanagh

Published by Orion on 23rd July 2020

Two sisters on trial for murder. Both accuse each other.
Who do YOU believe?

Alexandra Avellino has just found her father’s mutilated body, and needs the police right away. She believes her sister killed him, and that she is still in the house with a knife.

Sofia Avellino has just found her father’s mutilated body and needs the police right away. She believes her sister, Alexandra did it, and that she is still in the house, locked in the bathroom.

Both women are to go on trial at the same time. A joint trial in front of one jury.

But one of these women is lying. One of them is a murderer. Sitting in a jail cell, about to go on trial with her sister for murder, you might think that this is the last place she expected to be.

You’d be wrong.

 

Buried by Lynda La Plante

Published by Zaffre on 2nd April 2020

DC Jack Warr and his girlfriend Maggie have just moved to London to start a new life together. Though charming, Jack can’t seem to find his place in the world – until he’s drawn into an investigation that turns his life upside down.

In the aftermath of a fire at an isolated cottage, a badly charred body is discovered, along with the burnt remains of millions of stolen, untraceable bank notes.

Jack’s search leads him deep into a murky criminal underworld – a world he finds himself surprisingly good at navigating. But as the line of the law becomes blurred, how far will Jack go to find the answers – and what will it cost him?

 

Shadow Sands by Robert Bryndza

Published by Sphere on 20th October 2020

A DETECTIVE IN FREE FALL
After solving an all-too-personal case that almost cost her everything, Kate Marshall is struggling. And when she discovers two disembowelled bodies floating in a local reservoir, things go from bad to worse.

UNTIL SOMEONE MAKES HER AN OFFER TOO GOOD TO REFUSE
But Kate is given a chance to get her life back on track when she is asked to solve a decades-old mystery. The Shadow Sands reservoir was plagued by gruesome deaths for years, and now the murders have started again.

NOW, SHE’S BACK ON THE HUNT FOR A LEGENDARY KILLER
Kate and her assistant Tristan are dragged into a shady world of family secrets, deadly legends and grisly murders. It’s a case that throws up more questions than answers, and someone is desperate to keep the truth buried at any cost. The clock is ticking and Kate must delve deep into the past if she wants to stop more victims turning up dead at Shadow Sands.

 

The Body in the Snow by Nick Louth

Published by Canelo on 31st January 2020

A young detective is out for a jog on a snowy winter morning. Then she sees something terrible: a murder in the park, sudden and inexplicable. A woman has been killed by a passing hooded cyclist.

It’s just DCI Craig Gillard’s luck that he’s on duty. The body is that of Tanvi Roy, one of the richest women in Britain and matriarch of a food empire. With a tangled web of family and business contacts and jealousies, Gillard’s job just got even more complex.

As he delves deeper into the Roy family, it’s clear that everything is not as it seems. As the investigation threatens to unravel, Gillard realises it’s only the beginning of his problems. Trouble of a different sort is brewing close to home…

 

Are you looking forward to reading any of these? I’d love to hear your thoughts.

 

 

 

Monthly Roundup – August 2019

Having more time on my hands, August is the month I manage to read a lot more than I do any other month and this month has been no exception. A couple of books crept to the top of my TBR list as they were on my most anticipated list and, thanks to Net Galley, I was able to get some early copies!

Books I Have Read

The Dirty Dozen by Linda La Plante

The fifth book in the Jane Tennison series sees the detective combating sexism as she joins the famous Flying Squad, investigating a particularly nasty armed robbery. Knowing that she will have to work twice as hard just to gain acceptance, we see the tenacious officer showing off her skills to the max as she shows the men just how it’s done. This is one of my favourite series at the moment.

 

Ice Cold Heart by P. J. Tracy

When a woman is found dead after a clandestine meeting, detectives Gino and Magozzi believe it could be a case of a sex game gone wrong. A chance meeting, however, leads them to think that this is not his first victim and time is running out if they are to save his next… This next installment in the Monkeewrench series is, in my opinion, one of the best.

 

The Perfect Lie by Karen Osman

Claire Carmichael has a great life but something happened a long time ago when she was at school that threatens to change everything. What has she kept hidden all these years and how does it link to what is about to happen to her and her family? This is a great thriller.

 

Daddy’s Girls by Sarah Flint

When an elderly woman is found dead in her bed, D. C. Charlie Stafford fears that the man responsible for a spate of burglaries has escalated his crimes. With another, equally heinous, criminal on the loose, decisions must be made about which avenues to pursue before more victims are found. Review will be published as part of the blog tour.

 

46801377._SY475_A Pair of Sharp Eyes by Kat Armstrong

Even before she arrives in Bristol, young Coronation Amesbury hears about the deaths of six young boys, all found with their throats cut. Determined to make her own way in life,  she is also determined to find out what happened to these poor children. A great debut for fans of historical fiction, the review will be published as part of the blog tour.

 

Your Guilty Lies by Ruth Heald

This story of Katie, a mother of young twin girls, had me gasping with shock on more than one occasion! With a husband and a friend who are obviously keeping secrets from her, this is one of those books where you need to keep reading to find out what awful event is going to happen next! Review will be published as part of the blog tour.

 

Now You See Them by Elly Griffiths

The fifth book in the Stephens and Mephisto series is set ten years after the events of the previous case, and we see a huge change in the personal lives of the main characters. With less ‘magic’ than the rest of the series, we see the police investigating the disappearance of several local women, with some of the characters getting a little too close for comfort.

 

Avaline Saddlebags by Netta Newbound and Marcus Brown

A serial killer is targeting male to female transexuals and it is up to DI Dylan Monroe and his team to investigate in this highly sensitive case. I thoroughly enjoyed this book and it will definitely be making my favourites list this year. My review will be published as part of the blog tour.

 

 

A Study in Scarlet by Arthur Conan Doyle

The well-known Sherlock Holmes book is given a retelling for a children’s audience. Despite this, I absolutely loved it and feel that this would be a great introduction to Sherlock for any young person.

 

 

The Liar’s Sister by Sarah A Denzil

Ten years ago, young Samuel Murray disappeared, never to be seen again. Now old wounds have been opened and the truth threatens to be revealed. How involved was Rosie Sharpe and will her and her sister, Heather, pay the price for their involvement? A shocking, fast-paced read. My review will be published as part of the blog tour.

 

Books I Have Acquired

 

Play with fire, and you’re going to get burned. The unputdownable new Ridpath crime thriller

In Manchester, a block of flats is burning. The only victim is a middle-aged man, sat watching TV. Are the fire and the man’s death an accident or is something more frightening at work?

Meanwhile, DI Ridpath is back with his wife and enjoying work at the Coroner’s Office, his myeloma still in remission. But the quiet life is soon shattered by a new threat.

More corpses start appearing; charred, burnt, silent bodies, strewn in the streets and lodged in buildings. Next to each one is a chilling message sprayed in orange ink.

Fighting on all fronts, Ridapth will be drawn into the dark past of his city and the youth football clubs of the 1990s. He must find the link before any more people die. Before the flames come close to home…

 

Mary Ann Nichols, Annie Chapman, Elizabeth Stride, Catherine Eddowes and Mary Jane Kelly are inextricably linked in history. Their names might not be instantly recognisable, and the identity of their murderer may have eluded detectives and historians throughout the years, but there is no mistaking the infamy of Jack the Ripper. For nine weeks during the autumn of 1888, the Whitechapel Murderer brought terror to London s East End, slashing women s throats and disembowelling them. London s most famous serial killer has been pored over time and again, yet his victims have been sorely neglected, reduced to the simple label: prostitute. The lives of these five women are rags-to-riches-to-rags stories of the most tragic kind. There was a time in each of their lives when these poor women had a job, money, a home and a family. Hardworking, determined and fiercely independent individuals, it was bad luck, or a wrong turn here or there, that left them wretched and destitute. Ignored by the press and overlooked by historians, it is time their stories were told.

 

Six friends trapped by one dark secret.

It was supposed to be our last weekend away as friends, before marriage and respectability beckoned. But what happened that Saturday changed everything.

In the middle of the night, someone died. The six of us promised each other we would not tell anyone about the body we buried. But now the pact has been broken. And the killing has started again …

Who knows what we did? And what price will we pay?

 

A DETECTIVE WHO WOULD STOP AT NOTHING
Kate Marshall was a rising star in the London Metropolitan police force. Young, ambitious and with a keen sense of justice, she solved several high-profile murder cases.

UNTIL A KILLER STOPPED HER IN HER TRACKS
But when Kate was tasked with tracking down a vicious serial killer, even her sharp instincts couldn’t help her find him – until he found her.

NOW, HE’S BACK FOR MORE
Sixteen years after her narrow escape, Kate lives a quiet life on the English coast, though her years with the police are still with her. And when one day she receives a letter from someone in her past, she is pulled back into the twisted mind of a murderer she knows only too well – and into a case only she can solve.

 

Two years ago, Ben Fenton went camping for the night with his brother Leo. When Ben woke up, he was covered in blood, and his brother had gone. Days later, Ben was facing a charge of murder. 

Ben’s girlfriend, Ana Seabrook, has always sworn he was innocent. And now, on the hottest day of a sweltering heat wave, a body has been unearthed in Ana’s village. A body that might be connected to what really happened between Ben and Leo that fateful night. 

DCI Jansen, of St Albans police, is sure that Ana has something to hide. But as Jansen knows all too well, nothing stays buried forever…

 

 

When art dealer Ivan Fielding is found dead of a heart attack in his home, surrounded by the treasures he’s collected all his life, it doesn’t initially seem like a case for Detective Inspector Frost and the Denton police force. But then signs of a burglary are discovered, and Frost senses there’s more to the story than meets the eye – even though the only thing taken was a worthless amateur painting.

Then a young girl is abducted outside the school, an infamous gangster fresh from prison arrives in the area, and dead bodies start turning up in the woods. As Frost and his team dig deeper, everything seems to lead back to Ivan Fielding’s murky lifetime of misdeeds.

Will they find the answers they need before the dead man’s past puts them all at risk?

 

Have you read any of these or are any of them on your TBR list? At the moment, I’m reading The Posing Playwright, the fifth book in the Esther & Jack Enright mystery series by David Field, and my next read is going to be Luca Veste’s, The Six – this is one I’m really looking forward to!

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