Search

Go Buy The Book

Tag

Augusta Bloom

Hunt by Leona Deakin

When Dr Augusta Bloom is summoned to speak to the Foreign Secretary, she is intrigued. He is being held under the Terrorism Act and needs Bloom’s help to track down his niece, Scarlett, who he has not seen for a decade. She appears to have links to Artemis, a feminist group led by the charismatic Paula Kunis, but why has she distanced herself from her family? In order to find out, Bloom must go undercover, infiltrating the ranks at Artemis to find out exactly what their agenda is.


Hunt is the third in the Augusta Bloom series and, in my opinion, is the best so far. Augusta’s skills are put to the test as she finds herself deep undercover, trying to find out the true motives behind Artemis, an organisation who claim to be empowering women. While on the surface, this does appear to be the case, it does not taks Augusta long to realise that this is more like a cult, and one that it seems impossible to escape from. The tension became palpable as we begin to realise just how much danger Augusta has placed herself in and this kept me turning the pages as I tried to discover how she was going to get out of this terrifying situation.


We also get to understand a bit more about Augusta’s business partner, Marcus Jameson in this book, and it was good to see more of his investigative work, drawing upon his previous career to help him. The spectre of Seraphine is always hanging over Marcus and I enjoyed seeing this odd relationship rear its head again, albeit in a different way from the previous books.


The cult aspect of this book was fascinating to read and it was easy to understand how the women might be coerced into becoming part of it, parallels being drawn to the likes of Waco and Jonestown. I think the most terrifying part was how easy it was for these women to become indoctrinated, their families desperately trying and failing to make contact with them.


Hunt is a fast-past read that has left me eagerly awaiting the next installment.

With thanks to Transworld Digital and Net Galley for my copy.

Lost by Leona Deakin

An explosion at a military ball causes mayhem and destruction but when eight ambulances arrive at the scene and only seven arrive at the hospital, something else appears to be afoot. Dr Augusta Bloom is contacted by an old friend, Karene, who tells her that her partner, Captain Harry Peterson is missing, seemingly the occupant of the suspicious ambulance. When he is found three days later, the mystery deepens: why has he got no memory of anything that has happened in the past four years? How can Bloom get to the bottom of the mystery when the only person with the answers has no recollection of what has actually happened?

Lost is the sequel to Gone, and again features the talents of psychologist Dr Augusta Bloom and former MI6 operative, Marcus Jameson. I would recommend that, if you haven’t read the first in the series, you do so before reading this, as events in the first book definitely impact on the plot of this one. While it could be read as a standalone, I feel that an understanding of the characters will definitely be beneficial. There are also several huge spoilers in Lost, that would give away huge chunks of the plot from the previous book.

I think it is fair to say that this is a book that kept me on my toes throughout as there is so much going on and so many different elements to the plot. I did wonder several times how on earth the author was going to join all the threads together but she manages to do this successfully by the end of the book. With an explosive start, we are quickly thrown into the world of Captain Harry Peterson, a character who I found myself liking despite not knowing anything about his recent life due to his memory loss. We soon learn that he knows something that others are trying to discover, but what? This is gradually revealed as the book reaches its fast-paced conclusion but not before we find ourselves reacquainted a character from the previous installment, realising the role that they have played in the case.

I found Lost a very entertaining book that had me totally gripped in the final third. You do have to suspend belief a bit, but I have no problem with that as fiction gives you the license to do this! I’m looking forward to seeing where Leona Deakin takes Bloom and Jameson next.

With thanks to Net Galley and Random House UK, Transworld Publishers.

Gone by Leona Deakin

When a woman goes missing, the police are reluctant to investigate, especially as she has a history of leaving the family home. This seems different, though, and psychologist Dr. Augusta Bloom and her partner, Marcus, begin an investigation. When they discover that other people have vanished in similar circumstances, each of them receiving a birthday card with an invitation to play an unknown game, Bloom begins to realise that there is something larger at play. Who is behind the cards and what is their motive? When she makes a connection between the ‘victims’, her fears become real – they aren’t the ones who are in danger, they are the ones we should be scared of…

This is one of those books which, after reading the blurb, piqued my interest straight away as, although it was about missing people, there was definitely a huge twist. Just what would make these people voluntarily leave their lives behind them, as there seemed no evidence that they had been coerced in any way. I liked how we were kept waiting for quite a while before the connection between the missing people was revealed as this really kept my brain ticking over as I tried to work out what was going on! When the truth was revealed, this definitely ramped up the tension as I began to understand the twisted nature of what was happening.

There is a second story running alongside this one, as we meet Seraphine, a schoolgirl who has been been involved in an incident at school which has left a man fighting for his life. Throughout these chapters, I felt as though I developed a better understanding of Dr. Bloom’s professional life as she worked with Seraphine to find out the truth about what really happened that day. Seraphine was a fascinating character and I enjoyed the insight into her world as she shared her asides.

If you are one of these people that completes quizzes on Facebook, (you know the ones – What is your spirit animal? What song are you?…) then this book will seriously make you think about doing one of them ever again! I have always been wary of things like this due to data mining, but Gone takes this to another level! Very scary!

Gone is a genuinely thrilling book with a novel plot. I liked how the threads all tied together nicely and I raced through the book, desperate to see how it would end. I really enjoyed this introduction to Augusta Bloom and Marcus Jameson and will be definitely be looking forward to any further books by Leona Deakin.

With thanks to Hayley Barnes for my copy of Gone.

 

 

Create a free website or blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑