When Dr Augusta Bloom is summoned to speak to the Foreign Secretary, she is intrigued. He is being held under the Terrorism Act and needs Bloom’s help to track down his niece, Scarlett, who he has not seen for a decade. She appears to have links to Artemis, a feminist group led by the charismatic Paula Kunis, but why has she distanced herself from her family? In order to find out, Bloom must go undercover, infiltrating the ranks at Artemis to find out exactly what their agenda is.


Hunt is the third in the Augusta Bloom series and, in my opinion, is the best so far. Augusta’s skills are put to the test as she finds herself deep undercover, trying to find out the true motives behind Artemis, an organisation who claim to be empowering women. While on the surface, this does appear to be the case, it does not taks Augusta long to realise that this is more like a cult, and one that it seems impossible to escape from. The tension became palpable as we begin to realise just how much danger Augusta has placed herself in and this kept me turning the pages as I tried to discover how she was going to get out of this terrifying situation.


We also get to understand a bit more about Augusta’s business partner, Marcus Jameson in this book, and it was good to see more of his investigative work, drawing upon his previous career to help him. The spectre of Seraphine is always hanging over Marcus and I enjoyed seeing this odd relationship rear its head again, albeit in a different way from the previous books.


The cult aspect of this book was fascinating to read and it was easy to understand how the women might be coerced into becoming part of it, parallels being drawn to the likes of Waco and Jonestown. I think the most terrifying part was how easy it was for these women to become indoctrinated, their families desperately trying and failing to make contact with them.


Hunt is a fast-past read that has left me eagerly awaiting the next installment.

With thanks to Transworld Digital and Net Galley for my copy.