An explosion at a military ball causes mayhem and destruction but when eight ambulances arrive at the scene and only seven arrive at the hospital, something else appears to be afoot. Dr Augusta Bloom is contacted by an old friend, Karene, who tells her that her partner, Captain Harry Peterson is missing, seemingly the occupant of the suspicious ambulance. When he is found three days later, the mystery deepens: why has he got no memory of anything that has happened in the past four years? How can Bloom get to the bottom of the mystery when the only person with the answers has no recollection of what has actually happened?

Lost is the sequel to Gone, and again features the talents of psychologist Dr Augusta Bloom and former MI6 operative, Marcus Jameson. I would recommend that, if you haven’t read the first in the series, you do so before reading this, as events in the first book definitely impact on the plot of this one. While it could be read as a standalone, I feel that an understanding of the characters will definitely be beneficial. There are also several huge spoilers in Lost, that would give away huge chunks of the plot from the previous book.

I think it is fair to say that this is a book that kept me on my toes throughout as there is so much going on and so many different elements to the plot. I did wonder several times how on earth the author was going to join all the threads together but she manages to do this successfully by the end of the book. With an explosive start, we are quickly thrown into the world of Captain Harry Peterson, a character who I found myself liking despite not knowing anything about his recent life due to his memory loss. We soon learn that he knows something that others are trying to discover, but what? This is gradually revealed as the book reaches its fast-paced conclusion but not before we find ourselves reacquainted a character from the previous installment, realising the role that they have played in the case.

I found Lost a very entertaining book that had me totally gripped in the final third. You do have to suspend belief a bit, but I have no problem with that as fiction gives you the license to do this! I’m looking forward to seeing where Leona Deakin takes Bloom and Jameson next.

With thanks to Net Galley and Random House UK, Transworld Publishers.