When a trainee CSI goes out for a run one early, snowy morning, the last thing she expects is to be is a witness to a barbaric crime: the body of a woman is found, bludgeoned to death by a passing cyclist. The victim, Tanvi Roy, is something of a celebrity and, thanks to her food empire, is one of Britain’s richest women. Due to the complexities of her work and family life, DCI Craig Gillard must delve deep into her past to find a motive and, hopefully, the killer.

The Body in the Snow is the fourth book in the DCI Craig Gillard series and although there are a few references to the previous book, this would only really be noticeable to anyone who has read it so this can definitely be read as a standalone.

Again, Nick Louth has constructed a complex plot, this time revolving around a wealthy Hindu family and the conflicts between the traditional way of doing things and the desire of the younger generation to move with the times. In a book with so many characters, it would be easy to get lost, but each one is so well-written that this is never the case. The abundance of characters helped to create a proper ‘whodunit’, each person seemingly having their own motive for wanting Mrs Roy dead.

The Body in the Snow is definitely a police procedural in that, as well as the main focus of the plot being on the investigation, we also get to read about the forensics involved in the case. I enjoyed reading about how, at the start of the story, Kirsty Mockett, the trainee CSI, fought to preserve evidence using less than orthodox techniques.

As someone who has read the previous book in this series, I was unnerved by the mentions of a particular character and look forward to seeing if this person plays a role in what looks like an excellent fifth installment, my appetite being whetted by the inclusion of an extract at the end of this book.

If you haven’t read any of this series, I can highly recommend them. Take a look at my reviews of other Nick Louth books:

The Body in the Mist

The Body on the Shore

With thanks to Canelo and Net Galley for my copy.