51gh4mWIeqLFifteen years ago, something happened to change the lives of three young girls. Kitty, now brain damaged, lives in a care home, frustrated that no one can hear her thoughts; Alison, now an art teacher, looks fine on the surface but is harbouring a secret she hopes will never come to light, and Vanessa, well Vanessa has paid the ultimate price… Someone is not content with letting the past stay in the past, however, and wants revenge.

Blood Sisters is told from the perspectives of two half-sisters, Alison and Kitty, over two time frames – 2001 and 2016. From an early age, Kitty was the ‘chosen’ one, favoured by her parents and closer to her friend, Vanessa, than her own half-sister. In the sections of the book set in 2001, it was hard to find any redeeming qualities in the spoilt Kitty whereas my sympathies lay firmly with Alison, the academic child who longed for the love of her mother once again. By 2016, however, my feelings towards Kitty had completely shifted and I felt the pain of a young woman who was desperate for a ‘normal’ life that didn’t involve wearing a crash helmet to keep her brain together and yearned for a voice that could be understood.

Although Alison appeared to have the ‘normal’ life that Kitty longed for, it was obvious that she was a very damaged woman due to the events of her past and taking a job as artist-in-residence at an open prison was never going to end well. It is fair to say that you have to suspend reality a fair bit as there are numerous coincidences that happen to Alison, but these events are essential in telling the story.

There are numerous plot twists throughout the book which kept me on my toes as I wondered which way it would turn next. This culminated in a final twist that I did not see coming – changing my opinion of one of the characters completely!

I thoroughly enjoyed Blood Sisters, reading it in a couple of sittings. Highly recommended!

With thanks to Penguin and Goodreads for the ARC.

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